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storybookmum

Debbie has graciously agreed to help us maintain a Canadian sticky up here so we can start getting ourselves together for a parallel Canadian/American Sonlight curriculum.I'm going to TRY to put this together into three specific headings - History/Geography, Fiction Core 3 (prior to 1850) and Fiction Core 4 (1850-present). If we can try to reply under each of those headings, I think we'll be doing ok. If you have other curriculum suggestions to help in blending the histories, I think we could throw them under History/Geography....for general discussion, we could stay right under this section, I guess?When you give us a book recommendation, please add anything you can in the way of a review and description.I apologise for seizing the reins like this - I'm won't begin Core 3 till fall 2007 - but I'm very eager to get something solid put together staying within a framework of the Sonlight 3 and 4 Cores. My personal plan is to parallel them as closely as possible, rounding each Core out to a two-year plan. I'm ordering the Core 3 and LA3-Adv. IG today, and GRADUALLY hope to have a full plan developed (WITH HELP!!) to share freely amongst ourselves here! I think this is a really exciting opportunity, and even though it means more work for us than we're maybe used to doing in terms of setup, it's going to be fun.Come along for the ride - let's start seeing those Canadian materials flowing in!

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storybookmum

Canadian History and Geography materials HERE!

Here's our starting point for the non-fiction resources.

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storybookmum

Set in 1815 in Prince Edward County, Ontario, this book tells the story of young Mary Urqhart, who has travelled from Scotland to settle in the wilderness of Upper Canada. She expects to meet her cousin, but finds he is dead, and is left to settle there on her own. She's strong, and she does just fine, making Upper Canada her own home.

I will say that it does contain elements that not everyone will be comfortable with, because it deals with the "Second Sight," but the story is beautifully told, and it is a classic, award-winner: It won the Canadian Library Award and the Young Adult Book Award.

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storybookmum

I'm having trouble organising and cascading this thread the way I want, then I made a mistake and couldn't edit fast enough. Can we delete Hawthorne Bay book and I'll put it back under the right heading, please?

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storybookmum

It might make sense to round out the Core 3 to 1867 from the Canadian perspective. Core 4 begins in 1850, but perhaps pre-Confederation would make a good dividing point for the Canadian books?

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storybookmum

Reply under here with your fiction books set in the more recent past.

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storybookmum

By Janet Lunn: Recommended as either a Read-Aloud or a Reader. Approx 200 pp.

Set in 1815 in Prince Edward County, Ontario, this book tells the story of young Mary Urqhart, who has travelled from Scotland to settle in the wilderness of Upper Canada. She expects to meet her cousin, but finds he is dead, and is left to settle there on her own. She's strong, and she does just fine, making Upper Canada her own home.

I will say that it does contain elements that not everyone will be comfortable with, because it deals with the "Second Sight," but the story is beautifully told, and it is a classic, award-winner: It won the Canadian Library Award and the Young Adult Book Award.

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storybookmum

By Linda Garfield, 64 pages. Kids Can Press

Kids get a close-up look at the political process and explore all aspects of an election — from the day Parliament is dissolved to the day after the polls close. Granfield charts the evolution of elections to the present day, when a candidate's media image can make or break the campaign. Canada Votes let kids in on how voting lists are now compiled electronically, what issue the last national referendum decided and more.

“A very good look at Canadian government for junior readers. Explains, with useful, lighthearted black and white illustrations, how Canadian federal elections are run, from every angle - polling stations, campaigns, eligibility, etc.” Emergency Librarian, April 1991

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storybookmum

I just got an interesting book, thicker, meant for older readers, so perhaps more of a read-aloud of selected passages: I Have Lived Here Since the World Began: An Ilustrated History of Canada's Native People, by Arthur J. Ray (Key Porter Press). It's more of a textbook, though, a bit dry, and as I say, for older readers. But it does have a lot of information in it, and some fascinating pictures, too.

Also, Kids Can Press has some really nice oversize books on different aspects of Canadian history, specifically designed for younger readers. I like their books very much.

The Kids Book of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada, by Diane Silvey and John Mantha. It divides the native peoples into 8 subgroups by region. This is a beautiful book, and is fully indexed, as well.

Check out the other books in the series:

The Kids Book of Canada

The Kids Book of Canadian History

The Kids Book of Canadian Prime Ministers

The Kids Book of Black Canadian History

The Kids Book of Canada's Railway

The Kids Book of Canadian Exploration

The Kids Book of the Far North

The Kids Book of Canadian Firsts

The Kids Book of Great Canadians

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storybookmum

Kathlh suggested this title as one Donna Ward suggested at a homeschooling conference.

This is what she posted about it in another thread:

I just wanted to add that Eric Walters has some Canadian historical fiction. Last year at a homeschooling conference Donna Ward suggested "Bully Boys" by Walters. It's set in the war of 1812--from a Canadian POV ;-) My boys (12&9) are really enjoying it. We have yet to try any of his other books but plan to.

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Guest Kg on the island

Oh! I have this one...just so happen to pick it up at a thrift shop...hope to pull it out NEXT time we have a federal election, which, with our track record, is probably not too far away...

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Maura

281 pgs. Bethany House Publishers

This book is about the French being sent out of Acadia by the British. It is told from the perspectives of two women, one French and one British. It has a Christian worldview. I read it to my dc while we studied Core 3. I love this book. It has a great story, but it will make you cry.

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Maura

by Donalda Dickie

204 pgs., excluding questions and index Red Leaf Press

I used this book alongside Core 3 with my dc. (I haven't finished it yet.) I thought it was a little like Story of the World in style and easy to understand. I learned a lot reading this book----My Canadian history knowledge is very minimal because my family left Canada when I was only four, so if ya'll don't like my recommendations, I understand.

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rgquimby
Reply under here with your fiction books set in the more recent past.

:DAnne of Green Gables, by L.M. Montgomery??

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source of joy

How about the Dear Canada series of books. I've read one to my dd and she absolutely loved it. My understanding is that most of the heroins are girls though so I don't know if boys would be interested in them?

How about Donna Ward's stuff? She's absolutely passionate about Canadian history/geography. She has a lot of good information as well. I just wish it was all organized to go along with the American history timeline Sonlight offers in the Core 3+4 core. I'm hoping to intersperse all the wonderful ideas from this thread in the appropriate time slots along with Sonlight's time period and do this core over a 2 year period. Hopefully this makes sense?

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kidseverywhere
Canadian History and Geography materials HERE!

Here's our starting point for the non-fiction resources.

I have no idea if this is where to post this or not...but....my dc have a computer 'game that they absolutely love that is really a Canadian Geography course. It is called "Cross-Country Canada 2" You can actually go into it and set up scenario's for them (they go 'on a trip' and you assign them commodities that they have to acquire from different cities/areas ie logs from the forest or fruit from the Okanagan Valley etc). My dh knows much more about it as he was taught about how to use it in the local Christian school when he taught there last yr. They use this and 'All the Right Type' from the same company in the classroom here at the cs (we were able to purchase them very inexpensively throught the school).

They also have History, and much more on the website but I have no knowledge of those but I believe they also have demo's you can download.

www.ingenuityworks.com

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mich5

that save alot of time in regards to blocking and grouping with the study of Canadian History is www.thehomeworks.ca This company specializes in our country's history.

Michelle

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Yoogie30

I would also recommend Donna Ward materials (Canada, My County (grade 1-4) and Geography, Province by Province) for Geography. For History you can use other materials by her: Courage and Conquest and Natives come to mind. You also check out her website at www.donnaward.ca.

She is very passionate about Canadian history/geography; just heard her speak at a homeschoolconvention last week.

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storybookmum

The Story of Canada, by Janet Lunn, Christopher Moore and Alan Daniel.

Paperback - 325 pages 3 edition (March 8, 2000)

Language: English

Key Porter Books ; ISBN: 1552631508

It's definitely a textbook, but as they go, it's not bad. I'm thinking of using this to parallel The Story of the USA...

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storybookmum

I was loathe to leave out anything, so I'm tackling both 3 and 4 with Canadian parallels in history, readers and read-alouds. I'm hoping only to stretch it to a year and a half each, but it's too early to say; I just got my hands on the IG for 3.

I think the Dear Canada books are great for supplements, as are the Our Canadian Girl (Penguin). I'd suggest the Dear Canadas as Read-Alouds, and the Our Canadian Girl for readers. Dear Canada does have instructor guides available, by the way (three of them, I think). There are some titles with boys, but the majority are about girls, yes.

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storybookmum

Scholastic Canada has a series: Scholastic Canada Biographies. They're very straightforward, well-organised and readable as short peeps into key figures in Canadian history.

Maxine Trottier wrote them, and they're all short little bites. A chapter a day, or every other day, would be great...just a little breaking up would be required, jumping them around to fit things chronologically. It would be great of Scholastic to put them together into a larger edition, but these smaller hands-on versions are nice for the kids to handle themselves, too.

Canadian Artists

Canadian Pioneers

Canadian Greats

Canadian Inventors

Canadian Stars

Canadian Leaders

Canadian Explorers

These would work really nicely in conjunction with the Kids Book of Canadian....series I listed above. The Kids Can Press books are more attractively laid out, but the information is reasonably varied and complimentary.

For a more irreverant approach, try Scholastic's Famous Dead Canadians, by Joan Stanbridge, and First Folk and Vile Voyageurs, by Claire McKay. I'm not as crazy about the McKay book, but it's right in line with the Horrible Histories, if you like them.

Acts of Courage, by John Melady (also Scholastic), is a 168-page book about the 17 people in history who have been awarded our top award for bravery, the Cross of Valour. Not all of this is easy to read - it's very intense, but inspiring.

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storybookmum

Kit Pearson's Guests of War trilogy is not to be missed - absolutely bang on fabulous writing. The last one is more of a teenaged book, and they're definitely RAs, not readers. I can't think of anything inappropriate for younger readers, although Norah does struggle hard with a crush.

Norah and her little brother Gavin are evacuated to Canada during WWII and live in Toronto with an older woman and her daughter. They're over there for five years, and Pearson covers just about every aspect of the experience you could hope for. Rife with discussion topics, but still a lighter and smooth read.

The Sky is Falling

Looking at the Moon

The Lights Go On Again

One of the reasons I'm keen to use these books is to heighten the sense of connection between us and England. I don't want that overlooked by the kids.

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storybookmum

Hard to have a Candian education without Anne!!

I love Anne (all of them!), but I have to admit that the Emily of New Moon books were closer to my heart. I preferred them, overall. My favourite Anne book was probably House of Dreams.

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Guest Kg on the island

I have this one, and I really like it. Not in-depth enough when discussing actual people (you'd need a biography for that), but it does have lots of colour and pictures and is interesting to read and look at.

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storybookmum

I just looked at the sample pages and they looked kind of drab and very textbook-ish; have you used them or just heard her speak?

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Guest Kg on the island
I just looked at the sample pages and they looked kind of drab and very textbook-ish; have you used them or just heard her speak?

This is a very good question. I have Donna Ward's Courage and Conquest and I am NOT impressed with it. I was all set to buy her whole kit and caboodle, but I'm glad I only started with this one, because I don't think I'll bother with the rest.

The C and C book is really just a quick synopsis of a person or event, which lists different resources to delve further into that part of history, and include a few questions per chapter. Once you actually delve into the resources she suggests, you don't need either her synopsis or her questions - they seem way to simple and boring after reading books like The Story of Canada and Canadian Biography for Young Readers.

I don't mean to offend anyone, honest. I just am less than impressed with Donna Wards materials. I think she'd be much better served providing a product along the lines of a SL IG or something like what Susan Wise Bauer has produced with the Story of the World series.

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Guest Kg on the island
Canadian History and Geography materials HERE!

Here's our starting point for the non-fiction resources.

I highly, highly recommend the DISCOVERING CANADA series by Robert Livesey & A.G. Smith. I think there are 6 or 8 books in the series, such as The Vikings, The Fur Traders, and New France.

They are not a "text" book per se, in that they have boring chapters with questions at the end; but they are filled with text! No colour, but nice pictures and suggested activities accompany each chapter. Very easy to read. My 7 year old gets as much out of them as my 11 year old does.

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storybookmum
This is a very good question. I have Donna Ward's Courage and Conquest and I am NOT impressed with it. I was all set to buy her whole kit and caboodle, but I'm glad I only started with this one, because I don't think I'll bother with the rest.

The C and C book is really just a quick synopsis of a person or event, which lists different resources to delve further into that part of history, and include a few questions per chapter. Once you actually delve into the resources she suggests, you don't need either her synopsis or her questions - they seem way to simple and boring after reading books like The Story of Canada and Canadian Biography for Young Readers.

I don't mean to offend anyone, honest. I just am less than impressed with Donna Wards materials. I think she'd be much better served providing a product along the lines of a SL IG or something like what Susan Wise Bauer has produced with the Story of the World series.

That was my first impression as well, very superficial questions based on minimal text, but I had only a few sample pages to work from. It's too bad - the descriptors sounded great. I've heard so many people speak highly of her - I gather she's a terrific speaker.

I had a similarly disappointing experience with the Discovery Canada Series from Stoddart (now distributed through Fitzhenry and Whiteside). I checked them out all excited because they sounded wonderful - fortunately I started at the library, because they're no fun at all to work with. Really stellar covers...that you can't judge the book from....ah, well.

The other books that I'd warn people off are Pierre Berton's children's books that are deceptively cloaked as being historical fiction. I think they may be out of print now - I'm at work and my quick digging isn't turning up the titles, but they're just miserable. His adult work is another matter, but these sorry excuses for historical fiction were absolutely offensive. The back cover makes it sound as though the story will be all about young protagonists in the midst of key historical events, and then - no word of exaggeration - said character gets one or two passing sentences somewhere in the midst of an interminably boring history mini-text. Horrific.

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Guest Kg on the island
I had a similarly disappointing experience with the Discovery Canada Series from Stoddart (now distributed through Fitzhenry and Whiteside). I checked them out all excited because they sounded wonderful - fortunately I started at the library' date=' because they're no fun at all to work with. Really stellar covers...that you can't judge the book from....ah, well.[/quote']

Do you mean the Discovering Canada series by Livesey & Smith? I actually like those - I was prepared to be disappointed once I paged through the inside, but I do like them.

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storybookmum
Do you mean the Discovering Canada series by Livesey & Smith? I actually like those - I was prepared to be disappointed once I paged through the inside' date=' but I do like them.[/quote']

They didn't grab me at all when I looked at them. I guess I can cope with disagreeing with you about something, since we seem to be pretty much on the same page with almost everything else! ;)

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mom2twogirls

I just went to the OCHEC conference on the weekend and spent quite a bit of time looking at Canadian resources. I was impressed with the packages put together by Voyageur Publishing (a division of The Home Works). They have a package called Canada, Our Home which includes The Kids Book of Canada, The Kids Book of Canadian History, Leif the Lucky, Paddle to the Sea, Columbus and a Canadian colouring book. It also includes a study guide that offers suggested comprehension questions, vocabulary and supplementary activities. I think I will use this as the basis for my integration with Core 3 and 4...

BTW - I agree with the comments re: Donna Ward materials. They are extremely textbookish and I will not be using them.

Dara-Lynn

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Yoogie30
I just looked at the sample pages and they looked kind of drab and very textbook-ish; have you used them or just heard her speak?

I have heard her speak; she was quite convincing in her passion for Canadian History. I have not used her materials yet, but did purchase the "Canada, My Country" book. I guess I'll find out next schoolyear how we like it ;)

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storybookmum

The publisher just sent me Discovering Canada: Black Heritage, for review (I am a freelance writer and reviewer, so I get lots of books....). I'll take a closer look; it just arrived today.

I still think it looks a little dry, but I'll give it a good chance. Unfortunately I have only one here. If I end up liking it, it means it'll cost me more money!! (series....they're brutal on the budget)

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maplesyrup

There's a great series of books by Barbara Greenwood - A Pioneer Story, Pioneer Thanksgiving, The Last Safe House, The Gold Rush Trail - there might be more. They are suitable for a broad age range and include great craft activities in the pioneer books.

Its a funny thing about Donna Ward materials. Whenever I ask around for Canadian materials DW is recommended. Then when I ask the person recommending them how it worked for their family they ALWAYS say that they gave up because it was so boring!!! So far I have received that response 100% of the time.

There is a big gap in the h/s market for fun, interesting Canadian materials.

Wow Canada is also a fun book - ds 7 loved it.

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storybookmum

I just love Barbara Greenwood's books. There's also A Pioneer Christmas (happy day, another one!!). I KNOW I had The Last Safe House, but I can't find it anywhere, it's driving me NUTS. I haven't even seen The Gold Rush Trail, I'll have to check that out, thanks!

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mich5

I find DW's books a bore as well! I'm not saying the information offered is poor quality but it's not the style of learning that works for us. I will be trying one of the study guide packages that are offered at The Home Works this summer. We've read all the books from one package and intend to carry on with the others.

Michelle

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Snowflake

I purchased The Story of Canada as my "spine" for our Canadian Core. When I first flipped through this book it struck me as the type Sonlight would use if it were to put a CDN Core together.

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Snowflake

This is an historical fiction by Barbara Greenwood, set during the Rebellion of 1837. For those who have the Story of Canada, it's pictured on page 105.

PS, thanks StoryBookMom for pointing me to this thread!

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storybookmum

Great book, thanks for bringing it up, Helve! It's so hard to go wrong with anything of Barbara Greenwood's.

Incidentally, if you email her, she writes back. She wrote back very promptly when my Caroline sent her an email around Christmas about enjoying her abridgement of Anne of Green Gables!

http://www.canscaip.org/bios/greenwoodb.html

Just delighted to have you join us, Helve! It's going to be great to keep having these titles coming together! So many to choose from!

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storybookmum

Jean Little's books! She has so many of them, and many of them aren't historical in nature, not in the least. But the two I'm thinking of right now are From Anna and its sequel, Listen for the Singing. These books are set just prior to, and then during, World War II, from the perspective of a family immigrating from Germany to Canada. The emphasis on the (impending) war itself is somewhat lighter in From Anna, and more impactful in the sequel.

Another of Little's to consider would be His Banner over Me, which is more or less an autobiography, the story of her childhood as the daughter of overseas missionaries. That would possibly be more of a read-aloud.

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storybookmum

For working with younger readers, Barbara Greenwood has a very nice abridgement of Anne of Green Gables,by the way. I've noticed that there are more people peeking in here that have younger children, so it's going to be worthwhile bringing in titles for a variety of levels, as well.

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hockeymom

I have slowly been getting around to looking at this thread in anticipation for this September. I will be starting Core 3 with my son and also doing Core K with my 5 y/o twins. I am from Saskatchewan and living in the States and definately want to give my kids some Canadian history mixed in with American. I was actually looling for a bannock recipe and came across this website. Although it is through Sask. education many of the books are dealing with all of Canada and many different aspects, differerent grade levels, etc. I thought there were some great references and thought I would pass what I found on.....

http://www.sasked.gov.sk.ca/curr_inst/iru/bibs/update02/socstud15.html

I hope this works. Thanks so much for starting this thread, I look forward to sharing and discovering new Canadian things to incorporate into our lives!icon7.gif

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RaineyJ

Does anyone have ideas for readers? I am looking for easy to read chapter books at a grade 3- 4 level. Kind of like the historical fiction books that SL uses in Core 3 and Core 4, but with Canadian content instead? Thanks.

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storybookmum

Readers not specifically tied into the history, then? Because I thought Our Canadian Girl series would make for good readers.

What about Morley Callaghan's Luke Baldwin's Vow, or Lost in the Barrens, by Farley Mowat? Or Mowat's Owls in the Family?

Have I mentioned Octagon Magic in here before? It's by Andre Norton. It's not set in Canada, but the protagonist is Canadian; it's about the Underground Railway.

The Margaret books by Bernice Thurman-Hunter, or any of hers? The Booky books are wonderful, too.

I'll keep thinking....

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storybookmum

Key Porter Books, ISBN 9781550130669

The Forward is by Janet Lunn. It's a nice anthology of a number of stories and poems that would probably make a good reader. Several are excerpts, so they might stir some interest.

There is a good representation here of Canadian authors.

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Platespinner

adv

Escape: Adventures of a Loyalist Family by Mary Beacock Fryer-- is good and I understand there is a sequel, but I have been unable to track it down. I would say its about a Grade 6 reading level, roughly, so it would be a reasonable read aloud.

Dear Canada: With Nothing but Our Courage is similar in content, but is more girl oriented.

I'm watching this thread closely. I'm a Canadian living in Alabama and will be combining Core 3 and Core 7 next year and hope to add in lots of Canadian content.

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storybookmum
adv

Escape: Adventures of a Loyalist Family by Mary Beacock Fryer-- is good and I understand there is a sequel, but I have been unable to track it down. I would say its about a Grade 6 reading level, roughly, so it would be a reasonable read aloud.

Welcome, Platespinner!

The sequel to Escape is called Beginning Again: Further Adventures of a Loyalist Family. Thanks for drawing these to our attention! Glad to have you here on Team Canada!

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Kel & the kids

Just wondering if anyone has used Danita's schedule on the Yahoo SL Canada board? If so what did you think? I haven't heard mention of it here so thought I'd ask.

I think this thread is awesome. I was just at our hs convention looking at Canadian stuff and I actually had a clue thanks to this recent discussion! I'm actually thinking of using Donna Ward's grade 1-4 book (Canada, My Country?) with DS this year just to get our feet wet with idea of studying Canada. I should probably ask for more resources on the Core K board for his age group. I really found most of them to be pretty lame, fill in the blank workbook things that really any child living in Canada everyday would probably know. I guess that's that key, come to think of it, they are designed for children living in classrooms all day!

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storybookmum

On Juno Beach: Canada's D-Day Heroes, by Hugh Brewster

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storybookmum

I haven't tried the schedule at SLCanada; I'm still in the working stages.

But - Canadian picture books? I can suggest a few. Some of them just have Canadian flavour and aren't particularly historical, but when you ask for K level books, I'm not thinking of the same degree of depth, of course.

M is for Maple: A Canadian Alphabet

P is for Puffin: A Newfoundland and Labrador Alphabet (this one isn't out yet, but it's part of the series - it'll be good!)

A is for Algonquin: An Ontario Alphabet

S is for Spirit Bear: A British Columbia Alphabet

A Pioneer ABC, by Mary Alice Downie

Laura

Boldly Canadian: The Story of the RCMP

Camels Always Do, by Lynn Manuel (Klondike adventure)

A Prairie Boy's Summer and A Prairie Boy's Winter, by William Kurelek

A Dog Came, too, by Ainslie Manson - true story of the dog who accompanied Alexander MacKenzie on his voyage across Canada. I love this book.

Mary of Mile 18, by Ann Blades

Silver Threads, by Marsha Skrypuch (with surprising illustrations by Michael Marchenko - you should see what he can REALLY do). This book's tough going - the content is heavy, though the reading level makes it a fine read-aloud. Read it first. Canadian internment of Ukrainian immigrants.

Digging Canadian History, by Rebecca Grambo.

Mama, Do you Love Me? by Barbara Joosse. I love this picture book. It's just a picture book with some unfamiliar imagery from the far north. Beautifully illustrated and lavishly loving.

O Canada, by Ted Harrison. If I remember correctly, Harrison includes old versions of "O Canada" in this book - I really like the old version:

"O, Canada, where pines and maples grow,

Great prairies spread, and lordly rivers flow.

How dear to us, thy broad domain,

From East to western Sea

Thou land of hope, for all who come

Thou true North strong and free...."

I am Canada, by Heather Patterson. Another simple picture book that's just lovely - all photographs, a nice cross-country spread, very warm.

Anne of Green Gables,the abridgement by Barbara Greenwood. Great intro to Anne.

A Poppy is to Remember, also by Heather Patterson. For those of you who may not be aware, "In Flander's Field" is a Canadian poem. This is one of the best books I've ever seen to explain that poem.

I haven't seen this one yet, but have heard about Loonies and Twonies: A Canadian Number Book. It's not out yet - I'll get back to you when I get my hands on it. Written by Mike Ulmer, illustrated by Melanie Rose. I don't know Rose, I don't think. The cover illustration reminds me of Heather Collins' work (she illustrated the Pioneer books, by Greenwood, if that's helpful to you).

Laura, by Maxine Trottier (story of Laura Secord in her childhood - fiction)

Phew! How's that for starters?

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sumchick

I've used this website as she has books broken down into different time periods as well as a schedule that follows. I don't use the schedule. I hope it gives you some ideas though. http://meghan.ontariogifted.org/history.htm

I also love the Livesy books (discover Canada). My kids have really enjoyed making the projects.

Karla in Canada

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sumchick

Here is a government resource that has snippiets of different Canadian historical information. http://www.collectionscanada.ca/2/3/h3-220-e.html

If you click on the books, it gives you a book list by event. Also there are some teachers resources that you can print off (which I haven't looked at very closely).

Karla in Canada

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storybookmum

By Morley Callaghan. I haven't read this in years, but I definitely will do it as a read-aloud with my daughter. The emotions in it are pretty intense - I think it would do better to be shared.

A young boy is sent to live with his aunt and uncle after his father, a doctor, dies of a heart attack (Luke is with him when he has the heart attack- the book starts with that).

His aunt and uncle are farmers, very pragmatic and down to earth. His uncle has an old dog, Dan, and he and Luke become fast friends. However, his uncle begins to notice (after another very dramatic event!) that Dan is getting older and not earning his keep. It's time to put Dan down.

Luke promises Dan that he won't let anything happen to him. The remainder of the book is set up to explore how Luke could keep his vow.

I love this book because of the integrity of the characters. There really isn't anybody one-dimensional in there except perhaps the henchman attempting to carry out Dan's demise. The uncle is an EXTREMELY interesting character.

It's highly charged, emotionally, but a wonderful book. And if I may be permitted a spoiler....well....in "spoiler white," read on.....it has a much happier ending than Old Yeller!

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storybookmum

...at my other favourite site in the world, Family Village.

You have to join, but it's free, and there's no spam.

http://www.familyvillage.ca

It's still a relatively small community of around 300-400 members, and only about 15 homeschoolers. But now, in the homeschooling forum, we have a section specifically devoted to "CanCore," a place where Sonlighters can talk about how they'd like to develop a parallel Canadian curriculum to accompany Core 3 and Core 4.

I've had a few people approach me wanting to work together on this - my hard drive is out for repair and I'm using DH's work computer to access the internet, so I don't have access to my address book. If you wanted to work with me, then here's a place where we can do it in a format similar to Sonlight's board. I appreciate this sticky, but it's getting hard to wade through.

Please, come and join us - it'll be fun to construct things together, I'm sure of it.

Here's the specific link to the Sonlight Canadian/American History Core: http://forum.familyvillage.ca/index.php?showforum=162

I really hope to see people out soon! I'm still in the very early construction phase of this plan myself, and am eager to collaborate.

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storybookmum

I just found these two new titles coming out in September from Scholastic. Aimed at boys specifically, they're the first two books in a new series called My Story. They'll be paperbacks, 144 pgs., aimed at readers nine and up - middle-grade historical fiction. From the catalogue:

Readers are taken into the personal world of teenage boys facing adversity. Distinguished authors lend their voices to these extensively researched novels, written in first-person formal and set in different periods of history. Inspired by real-life letters and diaries of the time.

Battle Of Britain - Harry Woods, England 1939-1941

By Chris Priestly

"Harry joins the RAF to protect his country, only to be called a coward by those who do not understand the battles raging in the air above. He loses friends and nearly loses his life when his plane goes down in the Channel."

The Trenches - Billy Stevens, the Western Front 1914-1918

By Jim Eldridge

"Sixteen-year-old Billy stevens joins the military to 'kick the Kaiser back to Germany.' He lies about his age to join up, and is initially disappointed when he is assigned to the Royal Engineers because of his telegraph training. But soon enough he is sent to the Front and the terrible sights and sounds of the trenches. Told in the first person, this exciting book lets young readers feel what it was like to live in England during the Great War."

I'll have the review copies toward the end of summer, and I'll let you know how they seem. I normally get them a touch before they are available in stores.

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storybookmum

I just got a lead on a Canadian/World wet erase map - I'm getting a quote soon. Please PM me if you're interested in this product. I don't have pricing information yet - I'm hoping I don't have to become a retailer, and that this company will stock it...

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RaineyJ

Did you know that Rod & Staff sells a North America Mark It Map in their catalog? I have one and have been quite happy with it. It is about half the size of Sonlight's World Mark It Map, but otherwise exactly the same thing. It is made by Geography Matters, which is the same company that makes the Sonlight World Mark It Map. Now, of course it isn't just strictly a Canadian map because it includes the US and Mexico, but I think it is large enough. Anyway, I just thought I'd share this with you. HTH

RaineyJ

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RaineyJ

I found another website that carries a lot of Canadian history & geography resources. They even have a fair number of workbooks if you are interested in that sort of thing.

https://www.ads-academic.com/index.asp

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storybookmum

Interesting, thank you! I'm waiting to hear back on my quote, still, but had small quantities in mind, so it may not work out. If it doesn't, I'll look at Rod and Staff's.

We're starting to use printouts more, too, which offsets the need somewhat.

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envision

Hi!

Thank you, Thank you, Thank you!!!!!

I have only just started PK so I won't be doing these cores for another few years...but I also wanted to include a canadian perspective in these areas at the appropriate time.

I will be watching the thread closely and perhaps I will come accross something to contribute also...

THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!!!!

Shanta

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storybookmum

Hi, Shanta! Feel free to pop into my other site, too, Family Village.ca. We have several Cdn homeschoolers there using Sonlight, most of whom are still too young to really be ready for Core 3, so we've got our research cut out for us. It's a good site, and we're able to break down topics a bit more than all sitting in one thread here, much though I appreciate it!

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Julie in Nova Scotia

Have any of you read the Our Canadian Girl series? I just discovered this through a search and am curious if they are worthy books. Also, if you go to the site (www.ourcanadiangirl.ca) , there is a list of related reading...any of those books look familiar to anyone?

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Guest Brenda in Canada

I purchased Canadian History for Dummies a few years ago now and loved it! It is such a good read and really gives a good overview. It as a ton of internet links, but I don't know how up-to-date they've kept those. I remember thinking that I wish Canadian History had been presented like this when I grew up (and I've always loved history and gobbled everything up). I have every intention of working this into our Canadian Studies with my kids.

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Julie in Nova Scotia
I just went to the OCHEC conference on the weekend and spent quite a bit of time looking at Canadian resources. I was impressed with the packages put together by Voyageur Publishing (a division of The Home Works). They have a package called Canada, Our Home which includes The Kids Book of Canada, The Kids Book of Canadian History, Leif the Lucky, Paddle to the Sea, Columbus and a Canadian colouring book. It also includes a study guide that offers suggested comprehension questions, vocabulary and supplementary activities. I think I will use this as the basis for my integration with Core 3 and 4...

Dara-Lynn

I bought this package in 2004 I think. We will definitely be using this as well. I think Home Works is closed now...I can't seem to get their website up anymore.

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Jane B.

The Home Works closed :eek:? My dsis spoke to them about two weeks ago! I hope they are just doing maintenance on their site.

Does anyone know what is happening with them?

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mom2twogirls

I have only read one of these books. The one I read seems to be geared to a slightly younger audience than the "Dear Canada" series. I am going to be reading more as I get ready for next year and hope to include some of them for my 7 yodd.

Dara-Lynn

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Julie in Nova Scotia

That's good to know. So do you plan to use them as a read aloud? Or at 8yo will she read them on her own?

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mom2twogirls

I plan to use them as readers for her but she is a voracious reader. The one I read could easily be used as a read-aloud. As I said before, I need to read more of these before I decide how they will be used. The one I read was heavy on story and a little light on historical details but I don't want to make a snap judgement.

Dara-Lynn

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Guest stircrazy101

Wow, storybookmum, you are doing what I've been trying to do, set up a canadian history core. Good for you, now I don't have to, lol! I am both Canadian and American and so I love both places. One thing I haven't yet found is a history book that isn't slanted. I'd like to find one if I could.

I too looked at Donna Ward's work and it looked good at first, but I knew I didn't like the work books, they looked boring. Then I heard her speak. I'm sorry, there are those who think she is great, but I couldn't sit any longer and listen to her; I walked out. She seemed to be very judgemental and biased on certain aspects of history. For myself I'll not use her stuff.

The discovering Canada series by Robert Livesey we do enjoy, but also being American I don't enjoy reading to my dc that the Rebels (the americans) butchered, slaughtered, murdered etc. the Loyalists (the british) when the Loyalists took over, conquered, seized, etc. We do like those books though. Of course, from the British perspective, they were in the right!

One book that we just loved is Madeleine Takes Command by Ethel C Brill. I've checked it out with other sources and it seems to be historicaly correctt. There is a statue of the heroine along the St. Lawrence river. Itis not only a story of a girl, but also of her two brothers. They held their family's fort against the Iroquois for many days. A fast paced read aloud! (1692)

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Jane B.
One thing I haven't yet found is a history book that isn't slanted. I'd like to find one if I could.

... but also being American I don't enjoy reading to my dc that the Rebels (the americans) butchered, slaughtered, murdered etc. the Loyalists (the british) when the Loyalists took over, conquered, seized, etc. We do like those books though. Of course, from the British perspective, they were in the right!

A few years ago I tried to teach Canadian and US history in parallel, and this was exactly the stumbling block that made me revise my whole year. I knew from childhood the real-life stories of what was actually done to my Loyalist ancestors, yet how could I not line up with Johnny Tremain??? I ended up separating the studies into two years.

I think an exciting telling of history always has a bias. To make a story colourful we accentuate the conflict, rather than try to give equal time to all the perspectives. Inevitably, we take a side. Also, an unspoken goal in history education of children is to build patriotism; that necessitates inducing sympathy for the choices the nation-builders made.

All the best to those of you who can actually teach these two histories in parallel! I found myself just too easily swayed - both ways - to handle the tension.

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