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Lois G.

High School Home Schooling in Ontario

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Lois G.

I am debating whether to home school through high school. My main concern is that a recognized diploma will not be earned. How will this affect my daughter's opportunities for post secondary school education? I'm looking for input on this from fellow Canadians.

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Robin E.

Can you access the Canadian History forum? I think you may be able to the first 30 days after you register, but I am not sure. It may be worth paying the $5 for a month worth of full forum access to be able to ask this question where it will be seen and answered by those in the know.

Still, my post will bump this to the top, and hopefully a Canadian will see it and be able to answer.

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Northern Breeze

Hi! I'm from BC. I'm not sure how things work in Ontario but in BC our children can be homeschooled right through high school and still earn their high school diploma. We need to have them follow the BC curriculum and write provincial exams. Is that a possibility in Ontario?

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Cindy in ON

Not all universities require a diploma, so it would be worth checking out universities in the area that are potentially where your children would attend. For example, University of Western Ontario is pretty open to homeschoolers but other schools are not. A lot of their websites will note it, one way or the other.

A couple of other options are doing online school (AMDEC or Virtual Learning are two options that have been used by friends (we used VL))...and the option my son chose was to attend high school for grade 12. One thing to note is that most Universities that do not require a diploma...they just look at the 6 Grade 12 marks and don't care about anything else! So that too is good to know!

My daughter is finishing up Grade 12 and will have no piece of paper at all, and she has no idea what she wants to do, so she is planning to head to Capernwray Bible School in Germany and they have no academic requirements...even better!

I would love to chat more about high school with you...just pm me!

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wagingpeace

Many Ontario universities will waive the diploma requirement for a student that has been homeschooled. U of T evaluates each case separately. Others such as Guelph, Ottawa, York, etc. require a letter indicating that the student has been homeschooled until grade 11 and either one of two requirements:

1. 6 4U courses. These are the grade 12 university prep courses. Among these must be the ones required for the specific major. For example, all majors require 4U English, and then others require 4U biology, math, etc. You have to look at the specific university and the specific major. These 6 4U courses can be taken at a regular high school, in summer or night school, by distance education (e.g. TVO ILC) etc.

2. Without the 4U courses, the student must take a test such as the SAT or ACT. Then, they must also take the subject test of the SAT if there is a requirement for a specific 4U course for the major. For example, if a geography major requires math 4U ("advanced functions") then the student would need to take the SAT subject test in math.

There is a special form that homeschooled students fill out from the OUAC (Ontario University Application Centre). The homeschool student can apply for the same number of universities as any other applicant and the deadlines are the same.

It is really easy to find the information for the universities. Just go to the website of the university you are interested in, go to admissions, choose "Ontario secondary" then "homeschooled applicant." The order might be different or called different names, but playing around a few minutes should land you in the right place. Most universities have policies regarding homeschooled applicants.

For Ontario universities, you do not need to provide a homemade transcript or a "diploma" from some sort of diploma service. It will not be recognized anyway. You just need to follow the guidelines for each university (i.e. the 2 possibilities listed above).

However, if you're thinking of a college instead of a university, most colleges have a requirement for a diploma and are reluctant to waive it. It seemed the universities are more up to date in this regard.

Personally, I am planning to either send my kids to high school for the grade 12 year so they can get their 4U courses, or have them do them by TVO ILC. But I can see how others might prefer the SAT/ACT route.

You should download the Ontario curriculum (google Ontario curriculum) for secondary school, especially for math and science. There are 2 separate pdf files for each subject (one for grades 9-10 and one for grades 11-12). That way you are familiar with what you need to prepare for the 4U courses should you choose to go that route.

Hope this helps.

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MissKris
Many Ontario universities will waive the diploma requirement for a student that has been homeschooled. U of T evaluates each case separately. Others such as Guelph, Ottawa, York, etc. require a letter indicating that the student has been homeschooled until grade 11 and either one of two requirements:

1. 6 4U courses. These are the grade 12 university prep courses. Among these must be the ones required for the specific major. For example, all majors require 4U English, and then others require 4U biology, math, etc. You have to look at the specific university and the specific major. These 6 4U courses can be taken at a regular high school, in summer or night school, by distance education (e.g. TVO ILC) etc.

2. Without the 4U courses, the student must take a test such as the SAT or ACT. Then, they must also take the subject test of the SAT if there is a requirement for a specific 4U course for the major. For example, if a geography major requires math 4U ("advanced functions") then the student would need to take the SAT subject test in math.

There is a special form that homeschooled students fill out from the OUAC (Ontario University Application Centre). The homeschool student can apply for the same number of universities as any other applicant and the deadlines are the same.

It is really easy to find the information for the universities. Just go to the website of the university you are interested in, go to admissions, choose "Ontario secondary" then "homeschooled applicant." The order might be different or called different names, but playing around a few minutes should land you in the right place. Most universities have policies regarding homeschooled applicants.

For Ontario universities, you do not need to provide a homemade transcript or a "diploma" from some sort of diploma service. It will not be recognized anyway. You just need to follow the guidelines for each university (i.e. the 2 possibilities listed above).

However, if you're thinking of a college instead of a university, most colleges have a requirement for a diploma and are reluctant to waive it. It seemed the universities are more up to date in this regard.

Personally, I am planning to either send my kids to high school for the grade 12 year so they can get their 4U courses, or have them do them by TVO ILC. But I can see how others might prefer the SAT/ACT route.

You should download the Ontario curriculum (google Ontario curriculum) for secondary school, especially for math and science. There are 2 separate pdf files for each subject (one for grades 9-10 and one for grades 11-12). That way you are familiar with what you need to prepare for the 4U courses should you choose to go that route.

Hope this helps.

What she said;)

But great post. I am going to check all that out myself.

Even though I am overseas, I won't to be at Ontario standards, or better.

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mom22dds

Hi,

I have two daughters finishing Grade 11 & 7. Like everyone said, Ontario is not scary. My oldest did the ACT this last December. We did this a year early for a practice. She scored a composite of 27. She did well. The marks don't mean much until I did some research on various university sites.

A good website for links to various things in Ontario is the Ontario Federation of Teaching Parents http://www.ontariohomeschool.org/. This is a good site to explore even if you have been homeschooling for a while.

Like others mentioned you can earn a highschool diploma at home. It does limit your choices though. Another school not mentioned is http://www.cassupply.com/cachac.html. There website is very difficult to navigate or get any information. I met a representative at a conference. The catalogue is much easier. You can call for more information.

There are college and university fairs in our local schools and Christian schools. We have been to one. You can call your local high school after September to see when the college/university fair is booked. These give you a lot of information too on the attitudes towards homeschoolers.

I'd also suggest attending at least one conference during the highscool years. There are usually workshops that deal with highschool.

Hope all this helps,

Paula

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wagingpeace

This link has advice on planning a homeschool high school program for Ontario students. It has information on planning each year of high school based on the type of admissions possibility you are seeking (i.e. top six 4U courses or standardized tests).

http://www.rainsberger.ca/blog/home-school-through-high-school/a-plan-for-high-school/

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4evercanucks
I am debating whether to home school through high school. My main concern is that a recognized diploma will not be earned. How will this affect my daughter's opportunities for post secondary school education? I'm looking for input on this from fellow Canadians.

I just skimmed through the other replies and did see that some online schools were recommended to you. We are in BC and that is what we will be doing. We are given the option to use whatever curricula we choose. All we have to do is work with the teacher allocated to us in order to ensure that we follow our Provincial Standards (Provincial Learning Outcomes). You DO NOT have to use a specific curriculum that you may not wish to use. I clarified that yesterday at a convention (even though most schools will mention it in their websites) because I have already picked our curricula and have made many future plans and do not wish to change what we have been using or plan to use (which I have researched extensively) in order to use something that I may not wish to use. Anyway, going this route my boys will still get to graduate with an official diploma.

While I understand that it may not be a requirement for some Universities especially in Ontario to provide official transcripts, we would rather the boys have it and so if this is an issue with you also I feel the best way to go is to just investigate Online schools and see which is the most willing to work with you and the curricula you choose for your kiddos. It took me a while to decide on the one I wanted but I finally have and after meeting with them at the convention yesterday I will be enrolling my son this week coming up. Here in BC we have two options:

a) We can register. With this option we do not have to report, we can use whatever curricula we want but we don’t get funding or a diploma.

B) We can enroll and depending on the school we can choose whatever curricula we want once we ensure we are meeting our PLO’s, we can still get our funding and our kiddos will still get to graduate with an official diploma.

You will need to do some further research on this for Ontario specifically.

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storybookmum

These are wonderfully helpful replies!

Another consideration is the age of your kids now, because things are certainly changing fast, openIng up all the time for us.

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hrathech

I haven't finished reading the whole thing, but it looks relevant to your question:

http://www.ontariohomeschool.org/university.html

This one has a number of links, one which leads back to the site above.

http://homeschooling.suite101.com/article.cfm/the_day_after_tomorrow_highschool

I actually just googled "homeschooling and university" and tons of information comes up. Different universities, especially in the USA, have policies for homeschoolers, which could helpful in planning goals for high school.

Oh, and www.treeoflifeathome.com is actually in New Brunswick. Great people. We'll probably be using their high school program called Great Ideas. I'd recommend them highly.

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Barbara

Hello Annie!

Yes, I will sticky this thread for future reference.

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hrathech
I stand corrected. I don't know why I thought it was in Toronto.

It's just that we New Brunswickers have to stick together. Mike and Deb are great people, and a wonderful support in our homeschooling! But I didn't mean to make you feel bad!!

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mom2twogirls

Hi,

Just a follow-up to some of the information already given. Both the Independent Learning Centre (ILC) and Virtual Learning Centre (VLC) offer Ontario high school courses via the internet. They are very low cost because they are covered by your taxes if you are an Ontario resident. All of the courses required for an OSSD are availble using eLearning. You can also google eLearning Ontario or look at www.edu.gov.on.ca . Hope this helps!

Dara-Lynn Gerard

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kidseverywhere

Haven't been on here in a LONG time and just found this (old) thread! Thanks for bumping :)

I know it has been a while but just a few thoughts after reading through.

First be VERY careful about doing hs'ing and planning to jsut do the 6 4U courses for Gr 12 at school. This CAN work great for SOME schools. Our experience is that it was no problem at all for our local Christian school (which dh teaches at and both dh & I graduated from) and that is what our dd18 is doing this yr.

HOWEVER it is NOT so easy at a public highschool. It is VERY dependant on the principal there as to whether they will give credit for courses done at home! Our ds21 did this several yrs ago and it was a horrible fight to get his credits! They were very reluctant and wanted to see EVERYTHING he did to ensure he had covered ALL the material for every class credit we were claiming the same as what THEY taught. I do know others where it wasn't that hard but it CAN be.

Credits done with Canadian Christian Academy DO work fine - but you need to use their material. But - they are registered for OSSD diplomas. The VLC & ILC ones are great as mentioned because the cost is covered and they are recognised.

But - as also mentioned - every year there are more & more that are recognising and accepting homeschoolers with their own 'transcripts' and - I know of one of our group that was accepted to the local community college with a VERY basic 'handmade transcript' without any problem at all.

Dd took the SAT last yr as she wasn't sure how it would go or what she was doing this yr. She scored high enough to get into almost any University and in looking at the US ones she would do very well with scholarships if she decided to go there (she isn't). However - she is attending this yr and taking her 6 4U courses instead as she wanted all advanced science courses!

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