rbk mama

Parents of dyslexics: Can you please share resources you've found helpful?

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rbk mama

I thought it would be helpful to have a thread enabling people to share resources they've appreciated in addressing dyslexia. I'll share what we're doing; we are still fairly new at this, so I'm really looking forward to hearing what others are doing too.

This is what we've used so far with my DS (and liked - there are several other things that we didn't get far with):

AAS for spelling, paired up with SPIRE decodable readers from EPS: AAS has been great for us, though we've been in level 3 forever and seem to have hit a wall. The SPIRE readers were excellent because they didn't look like "baby" books even though the first set are primarily CVC words. I love that there are so many books and all 100% decodable.

ETC books (just the workbooks, which he does on his own)

AAS homophone book -- we love this, and DS does a few sheets each week.

Bookshare is awesome, and you can get a free membership if you have official verification of your DC's dyslexia. It comes with a decent text-to-speech program which highlights the words as it reads them, so DS is able to follow along and hopefully improve word recognition. We use this for his current core readers.

Wilson Reading program: we just began this after getting an evaluation done while in the US. I just wasn't able to help his reading progress enough without a formal program. We'll see how it goes.

HWT for his dysgraphia was awesome. We really just did the printing; cursive was too difficult and we dropped it.

He practices typing daily, using Type to Learn 4, a program that Susan Barton recommends.

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Merry

AAS has also been immensely helpful to us because it's an Orton Gillingham based method. They also have some articles up on their site.

www.covd.org, because vision processing issues and dyslexia often go hand in hand. Vision therapy was very helpful here.

Here's a great site with info for students with dyslexia at college/university.

I like this article on Stealth Dyslexia by Brock & Fernette Eide. Their book, The Mislabeled Child has been helpful to me too.

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bamagirl

What a great thread to start. I am tagging along. I also use AAS, Winston Grammar, and TT (which has been great for him). These are the things I've found works for him and I'm always researching others.

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Charlotte in MN

We have been on this journey for a long time. My daughter was 6 when she was struggling so much that we had her tested. She is now 16 and loves to read and write. One thing that you should really keep in mind is that this journey will be a marathon. It is not a short race.

I went to Orton-Gillingham training. This was invaluable to helping both girls. Many programs are based on it, but depending on how your child learns - they may not learn at the same pace as the program. Even if you use a program, I encourage you to think of it as a method. You may need to move faster or slower at times. We often think of drill as very boring. However, I found that visual, auditory and blending drills were very important in making everything automatic. For a child that has struggled, it iswonderful to whiz through those things you know well. The work that they have done with roots, prefixes and suffixes is very valuable.

We learned only 1 to 3 non-phonetic words a week. We kept them in a pack and did continual review. They had to spell 12 words a day. First they spelled any new words and ones they misspelled the previous time. If the word was spelled correctly, it went in the back. If not it stayed in the front. In this way my oldest became a very proficient speller - almost at grade level. It was a very easy, no stress way to do it. Once she had over 100 words, we did retire some of them. However, she still spelled 12 words, so it was never overwhelming. We made up all kinds of mnemonics to help her spell better (i.e. deSSerts are Super Sweet, but deSerts are only Sandy)

Dyslexia also impacts chosing other subjects. My girls understood math concepts, but struggled with the facts (visual memory problems). They also have problems with cluttered pages or curriculums where it is a continual review. If they had to change their thinking and approach for every problem, it took forever to do and was usually tear producing. Singapore worked well for their younger years and now they are using teaching textbooks.

We used Dance Mat typing (free on the internet by the BBC). It is very cute and has no speed component. The speed component in other programs caused frustration. The best thing I did for my youngest was to do her drills on the computer (either where I could see or using SKYPE). She became very proficient at typing.

I made games to play to help with things that we had learned. They did have a great time with that.

I like the handwriting in 'Writing Road to Reading' It has a very easy transition to cursive, but my girls seldom use cursive. They can read it though.

Now for the encouragement. My oldest was so severe that I was told by O-G experts that she would probably never learn to read fluently. Her rapid naming score was very low. Not only does she read at a college level, she wrote a book last year and is working on another one. My 2nd daughter also has auditory processing problems. It took her a long time to get to the point where she could read a book. She would have completely floundered in school with her multiple LDs, but she has made continued progress. I would say that her perfectionism is the worst thing that she deals with. We had a little saying 'You aren't responsible for anything you haven't been taught. If you have been taught and can't remember, it just isn't automatic yet.'

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Coco Mama

My dd9 is dyslexic with many otehr challenges too. I have been using Spell to Write and Read. It is a fairly inexpensive program compared to the others. IT is hard to learn how to us, but my dd went from barely being able to read CVC books December 2009 and now can read Amelia Bedellia, Harold and the Purple Crayon and other 2nd grade readers.

It is an orton product but a later life product or orton - Orton/Spalding The Reading specialist said that it would not work. But it has. I could not spend $50 twice a week on tutoring so I bought the program and went to the seminar and my dd is finally starting to read. She reads 45 minutes a day without complaining.

http://www.morningst...m/SWR_home.html

My dd also has problems with rapid naming. The doctor said that he has assessed over 2000 kids and she was one of the worst 4 kids he has ever worked with in the battery of tests that he gave to her.

Edited by Coco Mama

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BlueRidgeMtns

We use AAS also, and Barton Reading and Spelling - we've recently started with Barton, we are on Level 3 now.

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HisGrace

Could you please tell me the process you all went through to get the diagnosis. I have some concerns but our regular dr mentioned that we should test for ADD since it runs in the family. Just wondered how you got the diagnosis.

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mommywieb

I have no official diagnosis other than "specific learning disability" and high scores in behaviors associated with ADHD.

We had our son tested by the public school 4 years ago. Rather than spend money on an official diagnosis from a psychologist we

have just treated him as though he has dyslexia and ADHD and taken much advice from this forum as well as taking a class from the

University that trained teachers how to teach using the Sonday System, which is Orton-Gillingham Based. Before that I used Dianne Craft's

Teaching the Right Brained Child. This is what helped him learn to read. Sonday has helped a lot with spelling. Right Start Math helped a lot with

math. I still use supplements recommended by Dianne Craft, some of the ideas that worked with memory from her as well. My son now is a voracious reader. He especially likes Fantasy books, which we have to limit, but he recently finished reading Peace Child on his own, as he wanted to find out

what happened. He read half of the book yesterday.

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Charlotte in MN

My dd also has problems with rapid naming. The doctor said that he has assessed over 2000 kids and she was one of the worst 4 kids he has ever worked with in the battery of tests that he gave to her.

My daughter's rapid naming was incredibly low and has come up to average with O-G. The psych directly attributed that to the drills that we were doing.

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rbk mama

Could you please tell me the process you all went through to get the diagnosis. I have some concerns but our regular dr mentioned that we should test for ADD since it runs in the family. Just wondered how you got the diagnosis.

We were overseas when we first become suspicious our DS had dyslexia. I read a ton online about it, but this site was the most helpful for diagnosis:

http://www.dys-add.com/

DH and I watched an excellent video on that site which goes over signs and symptoms. She gives a list and says that if your child has 3 or more, you should consider the possibility of dyslexia. DS had about 15. She also showed examples of writing by kids with dysgraphia, and it was like looking at DS's notebook. From there we just began looking into how to remediate. Then this past year when back in the states we had formal testing done and his diagnosis was confirmed. We probably didn't need to do it, but the clinician had some really helpful recommendations, and it was good for us since we feel kind of "out there" as there is not much awareness where we live about dyslexia/dysgraphia.

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rbk mama

My daughter's rapid naming was incredibly low and has come up to average with O-G. The psych directly attributed that to the drills that we were doing.

Charlotte, what kind of drills did you do for this? My DS also has very low rapid naming. I never knew there was anything you could do about it! (Hmmm I am assuming it is rapid naming in general -- not directly reading-related-- not sure how O-G addresses this.)

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Charlotte in MN

The drills that we did were visual, auditory and blending drills for O-G. They are specifically designed to make the phonemes automatic for reading and spelling. However, they really helped with the rapid naming. Basically they are rapid naming drills and when you are practicing it every day, you get much better. Caroline's scores were so low when she was first tested at 6 1/2 that I was told that she would probably never read fluently. She was tested again (at Mayo Clinic) 10 months later and her scores were close to average. She now loves to read and reads fluently. The woman who tested Caroline the first time no longer tells parents that low rapid naming means that they will probably never read fluently. She tells them what O-G will do to help that.

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siloam

From Gander Publishing (I personally used LiPS, Seeing Stars and own Visualizing and Verbalizing):

LiPS (hearing and feeling the difference between sounds)

Seeing Stars (visualizing letters and words for those who haven't developed visual memory of works for spelling)

On Cloud Nine (visualizing numbers for mental math for those who haven't developed it)

Visualizing and Verbalizing (for those who struggle to see what they read-for comprehension)

O/G reading and spelling programs that I have used or heard good reviews of:

Barton Reading and Spelling (hs friendly, great customer service)

Wilson Reading (full program not the side ones-not great how to teach customer service is more direct to public school)

Sonday Reading System (very hs with great customer service)

I would tend to recommend the last for three reasons. It is cheaper than Barton, has good customer service and it seems to start a little earlier than Barton. Barton introduced too many letters too quickly for my ds..starts with 8 consonants and one vowel, then introduces 8 more consonants. I don't know for sure that Sonday begins earlier but it looks like it does. Barton also has 50% nonsense words, which adult and reading dyslexic students need, but was discouraging for a new reader who hadn't developed guessing habits. He wanted to have a real word appear, KWIM? Barton does have great hand movements, hooks for rules and the tiles. My kinsethetic ds went from trying to blend from 6 months to reading within a week just because the hand movements helped him focus.

For spelling problems only:

All About Spelling, just add in more review as needed. It is OK to go slow.

Heather

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jahkamakura

Since we live overseas we didn't have access to centers or expensive programs. We used Apples and Pears Spelling and the reading books from Sound Foundations. They really worked for Olivia, though her dyslexia is mild to moderate. She still struggles some, but now that she is high school spell check does most of the work.

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MamaJo

AAS is all that I have used and it has been great. I will say that my dd is an odd case of dyslexia. I taught her to read using Hooked on Phonics and she has always been above grade level with reading but couldn't write to save her life. I thought she was dysgraphic fro a long time but have recently discovered that she is indeed dyslexic.

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HisGrace

I've been doing a little research and while I do not have an official diagnosis I am pretty certain that both my girls are dyslexic. You all have been so helpful and I am definitely purchasing AAS. I think it will do them a lot of good. But I have also discovered that dyslexic children can struggle with math because of the issue of sequencing and memorization. Do any of you have suggestions on a math curriculum that is good for dyslexics? We have been on Alpha MUS for almost two years and they still struggle it. Especially if they must think through more that one or two steps. Example: 9+7= They are suppose to think...take 1 from 7 and give it to 9 making it a 10 and the 7 becomes a 6 so the answer is 16. They can do it but have to be reminded of the steps in the process almost everytime. They are just not mastering it.

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mommywieb

Right Start Math really helped my son understand math. We also went through Alpha with MUS and he just didn't get it. I then did level C with Right Start. It is kind of repetition and reteaching some things because they use an abacus and teach counting a little differently. You might need to use the transitions book. My son went from Right Start Level C (second grade) to Teaching Textbooks 5. I like TT because it frees me up to not have to be teaching every subject.

I will say that expecting mastery is not realistic with my son. He still does not have many facts mastered. But I would not hold your child back from progressing in math because they can not "master" the facts.

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rbk mama

I've been doing a little research and while I do not have an official diagnosis I am pretty certain that both my girls are dyslexic. You all have been so helpful and I am definitely purchasing AAS. I think it will do them a lot of good. But I have also discovered that dyslexic children can struggle with math because of the issue of sequencing and memorization. Do any of you have suggestions on a math curriculum that is good for dyslexics? We have been on Alpha MUS for almost two years and they still struggle it. Especially if they must think through more that one or two steps. Example: 9+7= They are suppose to think...take 1 from 7 and give it to 9 making it a 10 and the 7 becomes a 6 so the answer is 16. They can do it but have to be reminded of the steps in the process almost everytime. They are just not mastering it.

We loved many ideas from this book: http://www.amazon.com/Games-Math-Peggy-Kaye/dp/0394755103/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1316628880&sr=1-4

There are some fun games that reinforce the pairs that add up to 10 -- they really helped my DS. One was: take turns tossing ten paperclips into a dish thats several feet away; jot down how many make it in and how many don't for each turn. After a while... hey I don't need to count for the second #, it must be.... :) In general my DS really needed games -- for math and for reading, and they worked for him.

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rbk mama

Just wanted to say -- we are LOVING the Wilson Reading System!!! I was not happy with where DS was at in reading, and we were stalled out with AAS. Now I think it was a mistake to rely on AAS for everything -- it is after all a spelling program, not a reading program. Our combo of decodable readers and AAS worked great for the first few years, and brought him up to grade level in reading. But then he plateaued (which means he eventually slipped to below grade level). Anyway, I LOVE how Wilson is laid out, and its been super easy for me to do, without any training other than watching the DVD on how the lesson plan works. I drooled over the Barton program but it was too costly, and Wilson -- though not cheap -- is much more affordable. DH holds the fort for an hour 4 mornings/wk so that I can get uninterrupted time with DS, and he is making amazing progress, in both reading and spelling. Highly recommend! :)

Edited by rbk mama

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dragonfly summers

I am liking Apples and Pears better than I liked AAS. We are also using ABeCeDarian workbooks.

I found a product called Eyelighters. They are 6 inch long pieces of transparent plastic you use to highlight what you are reading. Nathanael is using the yellow one nearly every day, and he says it really helps.

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aemery55

I taught our dyslexic son to read using Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons, by Engelmann (that was before we knew about the dyslexia). He really caught on to it, and learned the basics from it much easier than our daughter who was mainly taught in public school using your basic phonetics and repetition. I think it was mainly helpful to him because of the way that book makes different letter sounds look different. He didn't have trouble transitioning to regular books. But he did have trouble with tracking and would instantly get headaches when asked to read. (I definitely agree about visual processing problems and dyslexia going hand-in-hand.) Anyhow, that was when we had him evaluated (which we did through a Davis Dyslexia Correction Center: http://www.dyslexia.com/) they suggested a method of making the letters out of ropes of clay, and of forming little clay "pictures" of the words he was having trouble with. Anyhow, I HIGHLY recommend Ron Davis' book The Gift of Dyslexia. It was incredibly eye-opening. It was shortly after this that our son was also diagnosed as having Asperger Syndrome - a hallmark of which is also "thinking in pictures" (as Temple Grandin's book is entitled).

The main thing that got our son reading voraciously was letting him choose his own book (from a pre-approved list, of course) and letting him read it at his own pace at bedtime. This was how we did all his readers last year. He could choose any school reader, then when that was done and from his own bookshelf. In this way he finished 3/4 of the Sonlight 3rd grade readers before the school year was even out. (The other 1/4 were "girly books" he had no intention of ever reading. I decided to give him the right to choose not to read a book, if it was obviously a book geared toward girls.) The headaches disappeared. I was asking him the questions, so I know he was doing the reading. But making the choice of order and at his own pace was key for him. This year HE chose to read his school books during school at the pace set out in the IG, and is using bedtime for his own pleasure reading. It seems to be working so far.

For spelling we use Sequential Spelling by AVKO (Audio Visual Kinesthetic Oral http://www.avko.org/). I do not have him write all the words, as writing is SO hard for him. He spells them orally, and only the ones he misses does he write on the chalkboard. He misses very few. The pattern of Sequential Spelling make perfect sense to his logical mind.

Anyhow, this is what has worked for us. Hope it is useful to someone!

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Aurora Borealis

We've found Apples and Pears easy to use and especially helpful in improving her writing and spelling.

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mikailin

Irlen Syndrome?Ive seen lots of people talk about COVD on these forums, but haven't seen anything about Irlen Syndrome (www.irlen.com). In August, my dd was going into 5th grade and reading at a late 2nd grade level. She also was "permanently" angry and stressed, had headaches and stomachaches associated with school work. I thought about sending her to PS, just so I wouldn't have to deal with her all day, but knew that wouldn't be the best for her. She got Irlen filters (colored glasses) in August and her reading level has jumped to mid-6th grade (spelling is still terrible, but I am hoping it will improve...we use AAS). Not only has her reading improved, but so has her behavior and the headaches have become rare and the stomachaches have gone away. The glasses have also improved her depth perception. She says that when she puts on her glasses, she "gets this warm comfortable feeling". I really can't tell you what a huge difference these glasses have made in our school day.

Irlen claims that they can help about 45% of kids labeled with learning disabilities. Their "treatment" is based on a theory that many of these kids have visual processing issues related to how they process light. If you go to them, you fill out a written screening form (it's online and free), then you get a screening with one of their "screeners" who will have your child look at a regular white page with writing on it, then look at the page again with various colored overlays and tell the screener what he/she sees. If they feel your child could benefit from the filters, they do a colored filter eye exam and get an exact prescription of color layers (my dd has 6 different color layers in her glasses). You buy frames with clear glass and they tint them. There is also an option for contact lenses with just the area covering the pupil colored so they look "normal".

These lenses aren't just for kids labeled as "dyslexic". My dd is the only person I know with the lenses (we have to travel a long way to get to the nearest diagnostician), but the teacher of her co-op class has a sister-in-law who is a doctor and has Irlen glasses. She could read fine (she had made it through medical school without glasses), but was getting headaches and the filters "cured" her. Irlen also says that the filters help many kids labeled as ADHD and even autistic.

Also: I have another dd12 who is dysgraphic. Another poster said they used HWT, but didn't do handwriting, just printing, because the handwriting was too hard. Well, my dd struggled with printing, but once she learned cursive, her writing got much better (it's still hard for her to write, but easier than printing). She greatly prefers typing, but I still make her write some assignments by hand, because I think it is a skill you still need to have...for example, I keep on asking friends with kids in college if they still have to write exams in blue books and keep on getting "yes" as the answer---it's too easy to cheat on a computer with internet access. So, don't assume that since your child has a hard time writing that you shouldn't teach cursive. For some kids, cursive is the "easier" way to write (less starting and stopping).

Edited by mikailin
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LisaMT4

Hi, we are new to the Dyslexia issue. My DS with the issue is 10y and we just had him tested last summer while in the States. We are currently posted in Taiwan. My son is reading at about a first grade level, I had thought it was his apraxia holding him back and I know part of it is. I was also told by a reading specialist that he wouldn't read better until his speech improved. I was so happy to get the dyslexia testing and have some new things to try and get him reading better.

We were and will get back to AAS, it is what lead me to looking at dyslexia, as he couldn't break words apart or put them together. We are using ABeCeDarian for reading. It is going well and I definitely think if you are looking for a reading program you should look. We started at Level A short and it is pretty easy for my son to read the words, but he is still learning to tap out the sounds and put them together. We have ETC and then we try to get in Draw Write Now. We have used MUS for math without any real issue as long as I don't feel he needs to do the facts in a timed test. He has done much better with multiplication and division facts than adding and subtracting.

I am curious, if there is anyone out there who's child didn't get to reading on grade level or even near. How did you handle all the reading? My kids are 3 yrs and then 4yrs apart. I can't see reading all the reader and read alouds for three levels but combining them just doesn't seem right. Although I guess the middle one appears to be catching on to reading so maybe he will be reading before the youngest is doing Cores.

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LisaMT4

Hi, we are new to the Dyslexia issue. My DS with the issue is 10y and we just had him tested last summer while in the States. We are currently posted in Taiwan. My son is reading at about a first grade level, I had thought it was his apraxia holding him back and I know part of it is. I was also told by a reading specialist that he wouldn't read better until his speech improved. I was so happy to get the dyslexia testing and have some new things to try and get him reading better.

We were and will get back to AAS, it is what lead me to looking at dyslexia, as he couldn't break words apart or put them together. We are using ABeCeDarian for reading. It is going well and I definitely think if you are looking for a reading program you should look. We started at Level A short and it is pretty easy for my son to read the words, but he is still learning to tap out the sounds and put them together. We have ETC and then we try to get in Draw Write Now. We have used MUS for math without any real issue as long as I don't feel he needs to do the facts in a timed test. He has done much better with multiplication and division facts than adding and subtracting.

I am curious, if there is anyone out there who's child didn't get to reading on grade level or even near. How did you handle all the reading? My kids are 3 yrs and then 4yrs apart. I can't see reading all the reader and read alouds for three levels but combining them just doesn't seem right. Although I guess the middle one appears to be catching on to reading so maybe he will be reading before the youngest is doing Cores.

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rbk mama

I am curious, if there is anyone out there who's child didn't get to reading on grade level or even near. How did you handle all the reading? My kids are 3 yrs and then 4yrs apart. I can't see reading all the reader and read alouds for three levels but combining them just doesn't seem right. Although I guess the middle one appears to be catching on to reading so maybe he will be reading before the youngest is doing Cores.

Sorry for the late response - I am just now seeing this. We were advised to keep exposing DS to grade level materials regardless of where his reading level is, which makes sense to me. (While at the same time giving him reading that is at his level). So right now he is doing his core readers through Bookshare -- I download the book from them and he reads along with the automated reader. He very quickly adjusted to the computer voice and enjoys it. I know others use audiobooks for their dyslexic readers - I might if we had access to a library. I do think its really important to keep them in books at their grade/maturity level regardless of their reading level.

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Coco Mama

Lisa I read 3 cores aloud to my kids. Core 3D, Core 1B and a pre K. I have looked into audio books but I have not been that coordinated in getting all my ducks in order.

Edited by Coco Mama

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myanmamomma

Hi, I'm following this thread with great interest. Thanks for starting it! A few people have mentioned to me on other threads that my dd has shown some of the early indicators of possible dyslexia. We're overseas also, so I'm just trying to make wise decisions and instruct her as though she has it, working with her strengths/weaknesses as much as possible.

We're just now embarking on pre-reading/reading stuff. I've got a cart over at Rainbow Resources with All About Reading pre-level 1 (just the teacher pack and student pack) ready to purchase to really explicitly do the pre-reading stuff, since she hasn't picked up on a lot of it through just natural exposure to lots of books and reading. However, after reading this thread now Abecedarian is also looking interesting. We're doing HWT for dd because she also struggles in this area, so that program works well for her needs. That's a drawback I see with the Abecedarian workbooks...

Any thoughts? She's a new five. Not trying to rush her at all, but she's very keen to learn and just struggles a bit in some really specific areas.

I'm hoping to make a wise decision since shipping stuff over here ends up being about half the price of the materials. :)

Also, I also looked at some of the other programs listed on this thread, like Barton, Sonday, etc... but we can't afford that much in one chunk right now.

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myanmamomma
Hi, I'm following this thread with great interest. Thanks for starting it! A few people have mentioned to me on other threads that my dd has shown some of the early indicators of possible dyslexia. We're overseas also, so I'm just trying to make wise decisions and instruct her as though she has it, working with her strengths/weaknesses as much as possible. We're just now embarking on pre-reading/reading stuff. I've got a cart over at Rainbow Resources with All About Reading pre-level 1 (just the teacher pack and student pack) ready to purchase to really explicitly do the pre-reading stuff, since she hasn't picked up on a lot of it through just natural exposure to lots of books and reading. However, after reading this thread now Abecedarian is also looking interesting. We're doing HWT for dd because she also struggles in this area, so that program works well for her needs. That's a drawback I see with the Abecedarian workbooks... Any thoughts? She's a new five. Not trying to rush her at all, but she's very keen to learn and just struggles a bit in some really specific areas. I'm hoping to make a wise decision since shipping stuff over here ends up being about half the price of the materials. :) Also, I also looked at some of the other programs listed on this thread, like Barton, Sonday, etc... but we can't afford that much in one chunk right now.

Well, when I wrote that I was waiting (had been waiting for a few hours at least - going away and coming back to check) for the "cart" page at Rainbow Resources to load on a different tab. Then I left the computer, my husband came to the computer, saw the cart had loaded and placed the order (last we had talked I was headed that direction.) So we have All About Reading slowly making it's way to Thailand, along with some more HWT manipulatives. :) I'm still interested if anyone has a comparison of the two programs (AAR and Abecedarian), but for now I'm excited to be trying what's on its way.

Thanks!

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ddonmain

Thank you so much for this post! I am really having a hard time with one of the boys and spelling.

I keep telling him it's not that you don't know the answers it's that you don't know how to spell the answers!

Off to check out some of these programs.

DenaRae

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Britmum

As welives overseas and there was no testing facility or program in english, we got the book GIFT OF DYSLEXIA by Ron Davis! Mentioned up theead. We did the excercises in the book and jumped about 4 grade levels in reading.

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Britmum

And sequential spelling program.

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Momof4JackAttacks

My dd9 is dyslexic with many otehr challenges too. I have been using Spell to Write and Read. It is a fairly inexpensive program compared to the others. IT is hard to learn how to us, but my dd went from barely being able to read CVC books December 2009 and now can read Amelia Bedellia, Harold and the Purple Crayon and other 2nd grade readers.

It is an orton product but a later life product or orton - Orton/Spalding The Reading specialist said that it would not work. But it has. I could not spend $50 twice a week on tutoring so I bought the program and went to the seminar and my dd is finally starting to read. She reads 45 minutes a day without complaining.

http://www.morningst...m/SWR_home.html

My dd also has problems with rapid naming. The doctor said that he has assessed over 2000 kids and she was one of the worst 4 kids he has ever worked with in the battery of tests that he gave to her.

I just came across this thread. I personally know Britta of Morning Star Learning. She is a part of our homeschool group and our boys are friends. Its so great that this program works for your dd.

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Makamae

I'm late to this thread, but long in this topic... we've been going through tons of dyslexia "solutions" for 5ish years. They have all produced varied success in children as dyslexia presents itself differently for different students. None have worked well for my student who is 12, going into 6th grade, and reads at a borderline 2nd/3rd grade level. He was lower than that until...

BARTON SYSTEM

LEARNING ALLY

Bookshare

NETFLIX

The Barton System. You can buy one level at a time - spreads out the cost. We had been going to a dyslexia tutoring center that used the system - very cost prohibitive in terms of money and time. The training DVDs that come with the Barton system are very thorough (and long, but it's worth it) giving me confidence that I can do this program. We save money, gas (more money), time and can tutor 5 days a week.

Through the Barton website (brightsolutions) and suggestions, we found the best blessing. Learning Ally (no space and .com). This allowed us to continue our Sonlight literature rich curriculum just in a different format. LA saves the parent from reading everything to the child with a reading disability. He or she will need a formal/written diagnosis to qualify for the service. With a diagnosis of a print learning disability (there are many), you can get all the audio books you want - read by humans - for $99/year. Military discount is $79/year. It has about 2/3 of our books for Core 3, plus my son chooses to supplement with books related to the subject and just for fun books. In a few weeks we go through 3-5 books! Imagine if we purchased those audio books!! Saves my voice for reading science and Bible - plus the 1/3 of books LA doesn't have... yet.

We bought an iPod touch to further make use of LA (Learning Ally). We can listen to books as a family in the car - time saver! I can't read and drive. We listen as a family through some cheap iPod touch speakers or the TVs surround sound during lunch or after dinner. I even got the kids to help me clean inside kitchen cupboards and pantry if they wanted to listen to my son's book. HA HA HA They did school and a chore and thought it was fun!

Your student needs a diagnosis for Barton as well, so if you've purchased that, Susan Barton (the owner) will verify your student's diagnosis with Learning Ally. Learning Ally can confirm your diagnosis with Bookshare (.org). Bookshare is read by a computer simulated voice (text-to-speech) so it's not ideal, but works. My son was used to this monotone voice with his Kindle text-to-speech option. Bookshare has more public school books and textbooks so you can find some on there that are not on Learning Ally. For instance, I will use the public school edition of The Landmark History of the American People - same author. This way my student can learn independently as his age and maturity dictate, but his reading doesn't allow - YET!

Starting the audio book process was a bit of a bite of our budget (LA for $80 and the iPod for over $180 + the Survivor case $25), but soooo worth it. My daughter and I don't have to read aloud so much and my son can "read" (listen) to his readers by himself just like his sister did. He is relishing his independence and listening as much as he can - during chores even since his iPod makes his books hands-free. Laundry, cleaning, yard work - grabs his iPod and off he goes. If he can listen to a book, he's got a better work ethic. Works for me!

We also got the list of movies that go with each core from Paula's List (archive?) as folks with dyslexia (and those without) learn well through movies. Biographies, documentaries, historical fiction.... netflix. Supplements Sonlight in lieu of writing and other methods that are tough for my dyslexic. He remembers movies. I like the suggestions in Netflix that find even more relevant movies and shows in the subject. My student may not read, but he's happily up to his ears and eyes in audiobooks and movies. Now he loves school even more that before! Who would have thought you could improve on Sonlight?

There's my two cents and it's probably over-priced! :D

Michelle

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PammyJean

My dd is 14 now and I have known since she was around 7 that she had dyslexia. She struggled and struggled, and I just came out an asked her what she saw when she looked at words. Then she just spilled it all out for me as if everyone saw their letters flipping around. Then I found out she flips around other things in her mind too. There used to be a car commercial that showed a car quickly from all different angles. She says that is how she can see objects in her mind. It is an ability that has a lot of benefits. She is actually excellent at drawing now and draws constantly. She learned how to crochet in about 5 minutes!

I would highly recommend Spell to Write and Read and Sequential Spelling. She has made great strides with those programs.

I think Pokemon cards have actually helped her, because their names are like nonsense words. It is like practice in word attack skills! And she enjoys it!

Finding her books that she is personally interested in has helped a lot. Kids with dyslexia are usually good at visualizing, and I think books with a lot of fantasy and imagery keep her interested, like Percy Jackson and Warrior Cats books. She likes to draw what she reads about as well. Now she reads all the time. I have to pull her away from them. I never thought that would happen!

Pam

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family2000

Were can you buy Apples and Pears?

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LisaMT4

What is Paula's list? Whe would I find it?

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Scarecrow

Pokemon helped us, too. It forced the kids to read in order to participate in something that interested them.

Sonday System. Similar to Barton, but less expensive.

Audiobooks. (Audible, Reading for Blind and Dyslexic, etc.)

These forums.

Edited by Scarecrow

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club190

Seconding everything already said but adding that there's a GREAT yahoo group that you can join called HeartofReading which would be a big help to you.

Blessings,

chris

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Jennifer in AZ

My new favorite book about dyslexia is The Dyslexic Advantage. Their website is http://dyslexicadvantage.com/ I haven't looked at the website yet, but if it's as good as the book I'm sure there is all kinds of useful information there.

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rbk mama

My new favorite book about dyslexia is The Dyslexic Advantage. Their website is http://dyslexicadvantage.com/ I haven't looked at the website yet, but if it's as good as the book I'm sure there is all kinds of useful information there.

This book is fabulous!!! I think its a must-read for anyone with dyslexic dc (or for adult dyslexics). It has entirely changed my perspective on dyslexia, opening my eyes to the profound strengths that accompany it. Very encouraging book, and helpful as well. We have used some of their suggestions for writing help (Writing Skills by Diana King) and have been glad we did.

ETA: I love the tech portion of their website!

Edited by rbk mama

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jcarlson44

Our 10yr old daughter has dyscalculia, dyslexia and dysgraphia....not so easy. She is on the autism spectrum but high functioning. ADHD too is an issue. That said....we discovered the Ron Davis Dyslexia Correction program and have been floored by it. I had read the book "The Gift of Dyslexia," by Ron Davis and felt that it just seemed to describe our daughter. So I did contact a Davis Dyslexia therapist and did an intensive 30 hours with her and it has helped not only her reading and writing but also her physical balance and focus. We continue the program at home and now she can even spell words backwards without trouble...way cool!

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Finish Line

I'm using materials from www.iseesam.com with a 10 year old student for whom nothing else seems to have worked that her family has tried.

Part of her work is from the materials for teens and adults, and it is basically cutting the letters/phongrams to the first 14, then 28, and reacing and writing words that can be made from them (CVC, VC, CCVC, CVCC, and words that have the CV/CVV pattern with e/ee --me, see), and part of her work is reading the first set of I See Sam books. We're still in the beginning stages of making any progress at all. This is a child that absolutely could not even sound out, much less recognize the word "cat" a few months ago. She's up to book 9. We just found out this week that her corpus callosum does not transmit information between her hemispheres well, so they're working on that, too.

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rbk mama

Someone on these forums recommended wizardsspell.com for spelling practice and we have been LOVING it. My son does a list of words (which I have entered) every day, and it keeps track of which were misspelled. It takes less than 10 min. After he reaches 100% I move him on to another list. However, it also keeps track longterm (over as many months as you want), and will recommend words for review. He told me recently that he doesn't try hard to get each word right, but just types in what comes to him automatically. He says he doesn't see a point in getting the words right just for the test. So if he types out the words in a very relaxed, automatic manner, he knows that he KNOWS the words when he gets them right. So happy he figured that out on his own!! :D

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momof3

Does anyone have any feedback on NILD (National Institute for Learning Development)? Please post or PM any impressions you might have.

Thanks!

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jjn3beans

Were can you buy Apples and Pears?

I don't see where this was answered, and I know this is very late, but we used Bearing Away from DD6. This is the same publisher of Apples and Pears (Sound Foundations).

Here's the link.

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rbk mama

Highly recommend signing up for Susan Barton's newsletter (I think it comes out quarterly). It is always full of helpful info, links, and information about new books or research. Here is the most recent one:

http://www.dys-add.c...newsletter.html

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slo5c8

Is sonlight good for dyslexic students I have an eighth grader that has been in a special school since 6th grade, so I decided to homeschool him and I only know of sonlight and abeka curriculums.

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gracyomalley

DS 14 is was tested and diagnosed with dyslexia and severely slow processing speed at age 9.  We had been homeschooling and although it was obvious he struggled with reading, he seemed bright in other ways.  We did do 2 years of tutoring....it really helped and it helped me be sure he was getting what he needed.  I was lucky it was an option (although did have to sell a tractor to pay for it!).  

 

Sonlight was a great match for him  - although he cried when he opened the box for Core 3 and saw the pile of books - he ended up loving them.  He now reads at a college level but is extremely slow still - he's doing core 100 and get through the reading but it takes time...he spells at about a 3rd grade level (maybe) but his tutor expected that to stay an issue and recommended we not spend excessive time on it but use technology...in fact texting friends is improving his spelling right now!  Writing is his biggest hurdle left to overcome.  

 

The most important thing we did was separate his difficulties from overall learning - tons of audio books, (mostly classics), TT and Plato science that have large audio-visual components and less writing, and FIND THE AREA a kid shines in - education specialists call these "islands of excellence" and every kid has them - even if its getting along with people, helping others, having a nice smile - to sports, music, art, etc.  Lots of kids with dyslexia have "real" talents as well.  

 

With the advice of educational experts I have let DS push the limits with music (he has played violin in an adult orchestra since age 12) and continue to do a sport -despite this "taking away" from extra work on writing and spelling....

 

He's not a dyslexic - he's a musician, gymnast, good friend, hard working big brother who loves literature - but happens to have significant dyslexia....

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ladybug12

My 8yo son is displaying a lot of symptoms of dyslexia. He also has Asperger's, ADHD, sensory processing disorder, & dysgraphia. His fluency had greatly improved in reading CVC words with Sonlight LA1, even thought he was still being tripped up sometimes by CCVC and CVCC words. A few weeks ago, we started long vowel-silent E words and things have come to a screeching halt. Now he's unsure of everything he reads. I've been suspicious of dyslexia for awhile and now that I've been researching it, I have little doubt that that's the problem.

 

I've been using AAS with him and have liked the way it's laid out and he does well with the multisensory approach. I've been considering using AAR to supplement Sonlight's LA. Has anyone had success with this for their dyslexic student? AAR was mentioned above (about 2 years ago) but I don't see any response to it.

 

Any thought?

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pieceofclay

Our 9yo son is in the process of being tested so we do not have any official diagnosis. He learned that alphabet, but learning the vowel sounds was a mystery. We worked on short vowel sounds for a year and a half with very little progress. When he was 8, we got AAR 1 and the sounds finally started to make sense to him. Last week he finished level 2 and is reading at an early 2nd grade level. We also let him choose his readers. He would rather work his way slowly through a book of his choice than read a less interesting book at his level.

We will start AAR Level 3 in August and are very pleased with the program.

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Appleforall

Well, We're still marching through or wading through learning how to read and get beyond 1st grade math in 5th grade. My DD10 has severe dyslexia/ dyscalculia/ dysgraphia. 

 

For those with severe math problems I think I've found an excellent program through Landmark School (www.landmarkschool.org). I attended a one day seminar this summer and next year I hope to attend a week long course. It was how to teach multiplication and division and it was excellent. The course was taught and written by Chris Woodin (check out http://www.youtube.com/user/woodinmath). I learned a lot from just watching his clips, but going on the course ($150) was well worth it - I don't live far from Cape Cod so it was easy for me ... but you can buy the book for $50 and that has been great for all my kids. My DD10 isn't yet in that book but I did learn some great techniques for her for addition/ subtraction which we are working through now.

 

We have tried MUS, Right Start, Touch Math, BJU Math, Numicon (when in the UK) and none of these worked for her. Do not go near Touch Math btw. BJU complicated colored workbook was difficult for her to concentrate. MUS - the colored blocks are not ordered (its just like a number line and not good enough), Right Start was far too difficult for her and Numicon (which was slightly better than the blocks in MUS) still confused her.

 

Chris Woodin's system uses almost a domino style 5 base which makes great sense and she is starting to understand the values of numbers without having to count with her fingers.

 

With spelling /reading we have (and continue to use) Sequential Spelling 1 (this is the 2nd year) but it is slow going and not always good for her ... for instance today we had paid, and then relayed, delayed ... I use Sounds-Write as well (http://www.sounds-write.co.uk) (from the UK) - I was trained in it in the UK which is a excellent program. I use Phonic Books with it and we are currently on the Alba series (http://www.phonicbooks.co.uk/alba-series-books.php). I bought it in the UK so if you are there I highly recommend it. However, we are nearly finished with that and the next series (Talisman) may be objectionable for some, but I feel as though she needs more interesting books for her age. The good thing about UK curriculum is that generally speaking they don't seem to rip you off ...

 

For reading/ writing she uses Grade 3 LA while the older two are doing Core F so she is hearing (and understanding) the Read-Alouds. It is hard though to do all the reading for the older two and still make sure that my DD is getting extra help with Phonics, but Core F seems great so far and I really hope we can all dig into it. 

 

The educational psychologist that assessed my DD suggested we use Cogmed (www.cogmed.com) to help improve her working memory. The cheapest way was for me to become a coach and she worked on the training with 9 other homeschool kids I coached through it. It was good, but super tough for her because it was a huge area of weakness ... but I do believe it helped her math a bit. 

 

I like Sonlight - especially for my older two who LOVE to read. We have had difficult times with Sonlight and my DD with Dyslexia ... however, she has learned how to listen and she is getting better and better with comprehension. This year I plan to sign up with Bookshare and I've also applied to our local charity Dyslexia Center for her to do an Orton-Gillingham program  - waiting list is 1-2 years though!

 

However, I like to remind myself that I shouldn't spend all my time working on trying to "fix" her weaknesses ... because she is excellent in Sports, Music and she is very intuitive with people.

 

I like the Animal School Story ...

 

Animal School

by George H. Reavis

 

Once upon a time, the animals decided they must do something heroic to meet the problems of  the world, so they organized a  school.  They adopted an activity curriculum consisting of running,  climbing, swimming, and flying.  To make it easier to administer, all of the animals took all of the subjects.

The DUCK was excellent in swimming, better in fact than his instructor.  He made passing grades in flying, but he was very poor in running.  Since he was slow in running, he had to stay after school and also drop swimming to practice running.  This was kept up until his webbed feet were badly worn and he was only an average in swimming.  But average was acceptable in school, and so nobody worried about that, except the duck.

The RABBIT started at the top of his class in running, but had a nervous breakdown because of so much make-up work in swimming.

The SQUIRREL was excellent in climbing until he developed frustration in the flying class, where his teacher made him start from the ground up instead of from the treetop down.  He also developed a “charlie-horse†from over-exertion and then received a “C†in climbing and a “D†in running.

The EAGLE was a problem child, and was disciplined severely.  In the climbing class, he beat all the others to the top of the tree, but instead of climbing, he insisted on using his own way to get there.

At the end of the years, an abnormal EEL that could swim exceedingly well and also run, climb, and fly a little, had the highest average and was valedictorian.

The PRAIRIE DOGS stayed out of school and fought the tax levy, because the administration would not add digging and burrowing to the curriculum.  They apprenticed their child to a BADGER and later joined the GROUND HOGS and GOPHERS to start a successful private school.

There is nothing so unequal as the equal treatment of unequals.

 

:) I have to remember this ... especially every day when I get discouraged and tired and feel like I'm ruining my child's life by homeschooling her! :)!

Edited by Appleforall

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tripsbbg

I am a newbie- but are doing the following with 2 of our 3 kids (triplets set)- 12 yes , 6th grade g/b.

AAS 5... done 1-4 too

AAR 3 with son

AAR 4 with daughter

sound match app

xtramath

ttextbooks 6

Investigating Fast ForWord software

Going through testing at ps district- however they do not diagnose dyslexsia, just issue like reading fluency. How does one get dyslexia diagnosis? We've got it I am sure.

Thanks for sharing!

Kathy

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vickity907

Could you please tell me the process you all went through to get the diagnosis. I have some concerns but our regular dr mentioned that we should test for ADD since it runs in the family. Just wondered how you got the diagnosis.

We went to a vision therapy place and that's where we started the process.  You could also ask your kids Dr.  for help as well.  They usually are a very good resource on where to begin.

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vickity907

Is sonlight good for dyslexic students I have an eighth grader that has been in a special school since 6th grade, so I decided to homeschool him and I only know of sonlight and abeka curriculums.

YES!!!The biggest reason I love i,t is because as a child I was NEVER read to and I missed out on all the childrens classics. I love reading to my kids.  It's turned out to my my favorite time of the day.  

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Charlotte in MN

I have started a blog that is full of games and tips that can be used with dyslexic students or those who are more traditional.learners. I spent a lot of years helping my girls learn to read and now I am helping other students. While I was at it, I thought I might as well spread the help further. The blog is https://makingreaders.wordpress.com

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LightOfGrace

I believe my daughter has dyslexia and as she has been struggling at reading, she tests at mid kindergarten level but is in the middle of second grade. We homeschool through a charter that will offer interventions and special education services once evaluated and diagnosed. 

We have a choice between using either All About Reading or Verticy Reading as an intervention while awaiting an assessment for dyslexia. If the intervention does not catch her up to grade level then testing will be done for dyslexia. This process takes the charter school four academic months, so an official label won't be done until next fall. I do plan to school over the summer but at a slower pace, probably covering the full sixteen weeks before the official time frame. That being said if you could choose between either all About Reading or Vercity Reading what would you choose? 

My oldest is a very tactile and kinesethic learner. She can spell well aloud  but can not write or recognize letters well, going backwards and doing the kindergarten HWOT with the manipulative blocks and chalkboards has helped with some letters but not all. But she can draw letters as large illustrations, i.e.: a bird with wings that make a b etc, so she does comprehend what the letters are supposed to look like. She is eight and a great storyteller and narrator, so she is motivated to read and write but just hasn't got there yet. 

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Countrymom9

NM.

 

 

Edited by Countrymom9

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