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mamatoseven

childhood apraxia of speech

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mamatoseven

My ds (5 next month) was just diagnosed.  He is highly unintelligible but on course in other areas with his peers.  He is starting Kinder this fall and I'd appreciate any info you have on what to expect with reading,etc.  I know each child is different but I'd love to hear your personal stories or other helpful information.  (I've been doing research as well) 

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Jamie Jo

I am returning to the forums after a LONG time away just to offer a word or two here.  My daughter was diagnosed back when she was four.  She will be turning 18 in the fall, and it has been a LONG haul.  From my initial research I learned that often apraxia is only part of the diagnosis, and is often found in correlation with other neurological disorders.  It seemed like for us it was an isolated symptom, but as time went on, she seemed to get further and further behind in her studies.  Vocabulary for every single subject became a huge issue.  By the time we got to high school, she was not prepared for that level of work.  If I am being honest with myself, she needs another three full years before I can say she is finished with high school.

 

Please don't let this scare you off.  What I would suggest is getting your son in the public school system, especially if they can offer support for you as a home educator.  He will need an IEP somewhere along the way, but well before high school.  I learned this the hard way.  That will be the best hope for him getting accommodations if/when needed way down the road.

 

Reading has been a problem area for my daughter for sure, but we've done the best we could.  I got her books on tape to help us attempt to keep up, but later learned she is a highly visual learner, so that didn't help as much as I had hoped.

 

Advocate for your son, and be ready to support him for the long haul.  It's not something they outgrow.  It just looks different later, even once their speech is intelligible and all.

 

I hope your journey is smooth and pray you find the proper support people to help your ds.

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mamatoseven

Thank you very much for sharing this.

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Jamie Jo

You are more than welcome.

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OhElizabeth

My ds7 has apraxia, yes.  He started PROMPT when he was 2.  It's amazing therapy, yes, but the best part is the way it empowers *me* to help him at home.  They can teach you simplified versions of the prompts, so then you're able to bring it into your reading instruction, your home routines, etc. throughout the day.  For us it has been very powerful!  

 

Yes, usually there's more going on, so you'll want full psych evals.  There is a CTOPP normed for ages 4-6, so they could *screen* him for dyslexia.  My ds was diagnosed with dyslexia at newly 6.  I don't know that they'll diagnose it at newly 5, but yeah at 6 in some situations, especially when there's a big discrepancy between IQ and achievement.

 

The other helpful thing the psych did was run language testing.  You'd think with all the therapy we had had that we would have had language testing, but there was more!  That allowed us to catch some things that were affecting his reading, his ability to understand directions, etc.  

 

You won't know really how it rolls till you start in.  I don't think it's pat, because they vary.  My ds doesn't have an issue with vocabulary.  Now he had issues with same/different, categories, wh-words, etc., but that stemmed from the (later diagnosed) autism.  But just vocabulary, he's, um, 7 grades ahead at the moment.  Seriously.  So if you just assume then you'll be treating things that aren't issues.  That's why for me I want evals, testing, breakdowns, so I can target things.

 

Some kids will have it affect their reading, others won't.  

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mamatoseven

My ds7 has apraxia, yes.  He started PROMPT when he was 2.  It's amazing therapy, yes, but the best part is the way it empowers *me* to help him at home.  They can teach you simplified versions of the prompts, so then you're able to bring it into your reading instruction, your home routines, etc. throughout the day.  For us it has been very powerful!  

 

Yes, usually there's more going on, so you'll want full psych evals.  There is a CTOPP normed for ages 4-6, so they could *screen* him for dyslexia.  My ds was diagnosed with dyslexia at newly 6.  I don't know that they'll diagnose it at newly 5, but yeah at 6 in some situations, especially when there's a big discrepancy between IQ and achievement.

 

The other helpful thing the psych did was run language testing.  You'd think with all the therapy we had had that we would have had language testing, but there was more!  That allowed us to catch some things that were affecting his reading, his ability to understand directions, etc.  

 

You won't know really how it rolls till you start in.  I don't think it's pat, because they vary.  My ds doesn't have an issue with vocabulary.  Now he had issues with same/different, categories, wh-words, etc., but that stemmed from the (later diagnosed) autism.  But just vocabulary, he's, um, 7 grades ahead at the moment.  Seriously.  So if you just assume then you'll be treating things that aren't issues.  That's why for me I want evals, testing, breakdowns, so I can target things.

 

Some kids will have it affect their reading, others won't.

Thank you! That is very helpful!

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Heritage of Sons

You are more than welcome.

off topic:  Glad to see you popping on the forums!

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