Sippin' Lymeade

Vocabulary and handwritten notes for dyslexic/dysgraphic

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Sippin' Lymeade

I believe my daughter to be stealth dyslexic as well as dysgraphic. Within the last year I had the school district test her and say she was "fine".  We are broke, so while I'm working on starting an at home business (actually 2!), for the time being, I can't afford further testing.  She is an upcoming sophomore.

 

I need recommendations for how to get to be able to get through science classes and other classes with lot of unfamiliar vocabulary. She just skips the unfamiliar words, which doesn't work so great in that situation.  I've done lots of phonics and spelling with her, but she's still really weak on sounding out. I need suggestions for how to adapt the work more than how to teach her to sound out the words. 

 

Also, she says it physically hurts to hand write things. I've tried a million different grips, etc. We type a lot, but I think she needs a little more ability to write by hand to function in life.

 

Any suggestions?

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Merry

Is she doing science at home, or are you outsourcing? If at home, I would have her focus on the vocab that will be on the test and have her memorize those. That can cut down your list quite a bit.

With regard to note-taking--I just worked on this gradually throughout highschool. I had my kids do T-notes (like Cornell Notes), where they put a topic on one side an all the important info on the other. I went over those notes with my kids several times per week. Praise her for any good information she notes. If something obvious is left off, ask her and see if she remembers it--if so, write it down for her. You are modeling the types of things that you consider important for note-taking, and it's okay to look at this as a process and help her along. Doing notes daily will help her gradually increase her stamina. (If she is college bound, she'll have to do a lot of note-taking in her classes, essay tests etc...--it's good to work on this in high school.) If she doesn't remember something and you think it's pretty important, you may want to look it up together--again, you are encouraging and modeling note-taking here. I would even let that be more important than how much content you cover, because it's an important skill.

My son didn't really like various grips, but he did prefer those mechanical pencils that are bigger around, and still uses those. If you are using regular thin pens or pencils, look for something that has a bigger grip (I like this in a pen too). It's a bit easier to hold.

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texasmomtothree

My husband who teaches in college says that students often use laptops to take notes in his classes. It is common place now. I wouldn't worry so much about the physical act of notetaking with her but just start working on her taking notes on a laptop. As far as vocabulary goes I would probably limit the scope of it liking Merry suggested and just get her in the habit of making notecards and doing daily review as much as is needed.

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Merry

My husband who teaches in college says that students often use laptops to take notes in his classes. It is common place now. I wouldn't worry so much about the physical act of notetaking with her but just start working on her taking notes on a laptop.

It can depend on the instructor and the school, but some instructors don't allow them in class (imagine a lecture hall where all students typed their notes...) But even if they can, they probably can't use them for essay tests. I think it's worth not giving up on handwriting unless a student can get accommodations because of dysgraphia.

Edited by Merry
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Sippin' Lymeade

My husband who teaches in college says that students often use laptops to take notes in his classes. It is common place now. I wouldn't worry so much about the physical act of notetaking with her but just start working on her taking notes on a laptop. As far as vocabulary goes I would probably limit the scope of it liking Merry suggested and just get her in the habit of making notecards and doing daily review as much as is needed.

 

 

Is she doing science at home, or are you outsourcing? If at home, I would have her focus on the vocab that will be on the test and have her memorize those. That can cut down your list quite a bit.

With regard to note-taking--I just worked on this gradually throughout highschool. I had my kids do T-notes (like Cornell Notes), where they put a topic on one side an all the important info on the other. I went over those notes with my kids several times per week. Praise her for any good information she notes. If something obvious is left off, ask her and see if she remembers it--if so, write it down for her. You are modeling the types of things that you consider important for note-taking, and it's okay to look at this as a process and help her along. Doing notes daily will help her gradually increase her stamina. (If she is college bound, she'll have to do a lot of note-taking in her classes, essay tests etc...--it's good to work on this in high school.) If she doesn't remember something and you think it's pretty important, you may want to look it up together--again, you are encouraging and modeling note-taking here. I would even let that be more important than how much content you cover, because it's an important skill.

My son didn't really like various grips, but he did prefer those mechanical pencils that are bigger around, and still uses those. If you are using regular thin pens or pencils, look for something that has a bigger grip (I like this in a pen too). It's a bit easier to hold.

Thanks for these suggestions!  I had tried to fix my notification settings, but either didn't save or otherwise messed them up, so I just now found these helpful responses.

 

Merry, we are using a once a week class for Science. I'm extra nervous b/c the teacher changed and I know nothing about him except a brief bio. 

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