Beautiful Terrible

Visual scanning, some Non-Verbal LD & Sensory issues, ADD...

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Beautiful Terrible

My daughter has a significant Visual Scanning disorder that is, we just learned, treatable with orthoptic therapy.  (Haven't figured out how to pay for it yet but I will be compensating as much as possible until then via homeschooling.)  This affects her significantly.  It is getting to the point that she can't even ride in the car without being "sick" from the visual problems.   She also has dyseidetic dyslexia (visual) and some features of Non-Verbal Learning Disorder, ADD and mild sensory issues according to psychological testing we had done this summer.  DD12 went to private school last year for the first time after being HS'd her whole life.  It was a very rough year.  She was very shut down at school.  She lost  a lot of confidence and now we understand why.  She is very high in her verbal skills and compensates and copes with her intelligence but writing, math, and spelling are her biggest challenges. She spells phonetically but reads at grade level.   I am confident that SL will help her as so much is accomplished through the literature rich method in history & science.  Her ability to remember details from SL books astounds me.... but don't ask her to recall math facts using flashcards or take a math test because she will shut down quicker than Fort Knox.  She's been through TT 3 the year before last.  She did math at the 5th grade level in private school but struggled a great deal last year. 

 

This year I don't know where to start her in math.  I feel like most of last year was a total waste of educational dollars.  I guess we wouldn't have known that her problems were so severe unless she had such big differences next to her peers prompting us to get her  tested.  Regardless, I am starting the year by quizzing her verbally on multiplication facts because that seems to be where she gets hung up in the placement tests.

 

And my dear daughter chews.... through pencils, plastics, threads, etc.  I finally got her a chewing necklace that she can chew on safely and provides some stress relief for her when she feels anxious. She is tickled pink that she has permission to chew something.  I couldn't keep up with providing her gum.

 

She avoids movement and bright lights (sunshine anyone?) and gets on sensory overload at times making her patience run thin especially around her siblings and sometimes with me- everyone else in the world thinks of me as a calming person!  Has to be cajoled into caring for herself. 

 

Back to the academic side.  Because she is apparently very quickly exhausted when she has to scan a page for information or write anything down, I am planning on doing as much verbally as I can.  I have already seen some improvement in her attitude and finding success with the verbal quizzing in math.  Before last week, she didn't know she was capable of remembering any math.  There is hope.  She let it slip that she is excited about starting the school year.  Yeah, homeschooling!

 

We are going to study core E this year.  Plan on giving lots of small breaks and digging deep for patience and inspiration.  Any advice from others teaching kids with similar issues would be appreciated.  I need all the help I can get!

 

Beautiful Terrible

 

 

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Hunny

I recommend trying Right Start math with her. It has a lot of manipulatives she can use, plus the abacus is a great tool. The focus is on developing mental math skills and doing a lot orally. There are plenty of games for practicing math facts that are more fun than using flash cards. The lessons can be easily broken down into shorter increments of time, and you can use it at her pace of learning.

My youngest went through vision therapy a couple years ago. One thing I found that helps him the most is the Visual Edge slant board. I purchased one online. It is set at just the right angle for him to be able to read and do his school work on. It has a clip to hold his paper or workbook and an adjustable book holder. It is also a whiteboard he can write on to practice spelling words. It is magnetic too, so he can put the All About Spelling tiles on it. I highly recommend getting one for her.

A couple of books I recommend are Eye Games and one about retraining the brain...can't recall the title now. It is good for children with sensory and visual issues. A couple friends of mine have used it and it has helped their children a lot. The Eye Games book will help you out until you can afford vision therapy.

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Z3TL

Another right start math fan here.  I have a dyslexic dyscalculalia (DD12), autistic(DD10) and gifted(DD10).  the beautiful thing is that it works from one side of the spectrum to the other :) one very happy mom and 3 happy girls.  Previously tried Horizons and singapore.

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