armymomof4

Central Auditory Processing Disorder

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armymomof4

My son, 12, was diagnosed with CAPD at the beginning of last school year.  I tried to get him help through the school like the speech therapist said I should.  He was denied any services.  This past summer we moved to a different state.  Again, I tried to get him help with no success.  So I am asking for help.  Who has had a child with this?  How have you helped him/her overcome the challenges?  My son does very well at home school. I allow him to read to himself all materials.  I ask him comprehension questions aloud as well as spelling.  However, I want to prepare him for life.  When his boss talks to him, he needs to be able to process what has been said.  When his boss gives him verbally multi-part directions, he needs to do them.  Any ideas or insights would be appreciated.  

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jhovde2015

I used to be an audiologist and I gave children the battery of tests for CAPD. Now I homeschool full time :) The best thing you can do is provide compensatory strategies. I'm not sure if the speech pathologist or audiologist has done that, but ask for any resources you can get. Often CAPD children are left behind in the classroom. I recommended children sit at the front to lessen distractions. Teachers would use a microphone to lessen the signal to noise ratio. CAPD kids struggle to understand in background noise (almost functions like a mild hearing loss but it isn't -- it's the way brain processes speech and noise). Take notes all the time.

I'm a mild CAPD case myself and I have a doctorate degree. I write everything down that I will struggle to remember. I use my iPhone for everything. I was able to work within  a busy clinic but only with organizational skills honed and in place. I'm not organized by nature. Not even close, but these skills can be learned. CAPD people need to be proactive. For example, if a woman gives me directions, I tell her to slow down and I make notes. Now we have GPS so that doesn't matter! I've never worked in high noise situations and I never will.

Since you homeschool, your son will have a tremendous advantage of learning organizational activities on his own without any pressure. He will have a fabulous signal to noise ratio (you and him across the table). You can gently redirect him when he goes off task. Practice giving directions that he can follow. Go slow and not too much and add as he can handle it. CAPD kids struggle with confidence much like ADD or ADHD kids. Focus on what he does well! Teach him to use tools (phone, notes etc, memory devices for learning new info). He'll be fine and maybe...it's just fine if he's not in a job with a great deal of background noise.  Multitasking is overrated and really not all that efficient. Plenty of research articles on that. What he needs to do is focus at hand on what is coming in and learning to break it down into manageable steps. Most CAPD kids struggle with auditory information, but are wonderful learners (visual etc). Don't fight it. Work around it and he'll soar.

Edited by jhovde2015
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mominco

Hi Armymomof4,

Were you able to get some resolution with this? I just started homeschooling two weeks ago w/Sonlight for my 15 year old son. He has  Asperger's, ADD & CAPD. I can offer some info about what we did to help him with his CAPD if you would like. I know it's been almost a year ago that you posted this.

Mominco

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christina0125
On 11/4/2017 at 11:20 PM, mominco said:

Hi Armymomof4,

Were you able to get some resolution with this? I just started homeschooling two weeks ago w/Sonlight for my 15 year old son. He has  Asperger's, ADD & CAPD. I can offer some info about what we did to help him with his CAPD if you would like. I know it's been almost a year ago that you posted this.

Mominco

I would LOVE to hear the things that have been helpful for you and your son! :)  My daughter is only 6 years now, and we have been working with her since she was 3 (at that time she was diagnosed with ASD with one of her biggest areas of struggle being Auditory Processing).  She’s growing incredibly, but I always love to see what is working for others to see if I can discover things that would be helpful for her as well. :) 

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