KWaters

Will Sonlight be a good fit for my hypervisual (auditory challenged) son?

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KWaters

I am a first year Sonlighter doing Core A with my first grader daughter.  Everything is working well and she is excelling, but we find it very difficult to get in all the reading with my Son's special challenges (It is very difficult for him to entertain himself.  Even if I give him "school work" at the table with us, He needs my undivided attention almost constantly.) I started our Sonlight journey with the intention of adding in my Son when he starts Kindergarten (this year).  Right after our school year started, he was diagnosed with Dyspraxia (motor planning disorder) and Sensory Processing Disorder.  We have learned through his therapist that He is hypervisual and struggles immensely with all things auditory.  So now that I'm realizing He won't be able to sit through read alouds and comprehend anything I'm at a loss for what to do.  I need to take the more kinesthetic/visual approach for him.  That being said, the idea of not being able to group them together is new to me and I'm not sure how to handle this coming school year.  Any advice/wisdom?

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Sandwich in Wi

Well...  I would start out by focusing on getting him reading, since he's visual and that will hopefully be a skill that will help him immensely.  Don't worry about history and read-alouds at this point.

Does he enjoy picture books?  If so, keep reading those to him and encourage him to "read" to himself.  Maybe wordless picture books (like Good Night Gorilla, etc.) would be good where he can tell himself the story.  Go slow and model those skills.

My son is not formally diagnosed like your son, although he did test with some auditory processing disorders and he's extremely visual.  When he was K age, he wanted the same few stories read to him over and over and over (and over!) every day.  I didn't realize it then, but I think that helped his learning to listen, over much time.

He has some hearing loss as well, and I remember in K (he was in public school then for speech therapy) that he was supposed to memorize his address and phone number.  We said it together over and over.  We sang it.  We practiced it for 2 weeks.  One day, I wrote it down on a sheet of paper in crayon and within 5 minutes he had it memorized.  That was a good lesson to me to not tell him things, but write them down for him.

As far as SL, we have been very slowly working our way through the cores.  He began after he came home from K, so 1st grade with P3/4 & 2nd was P4/5 because he still needed the picture books.  In 3rd we did a picture book American history year with lots of I Can Read It books, as well.  In 4th we did Core A with lots of hands-on things added in.  I had him stay labeled a 4th grader (so we called the next year grade 4.5) to catch up his academic and social skills and he did a Core F lite (still with lots of picture books).  This year he is doing Core B and he's doing very well comprehending the longer chapter books.

All that just to say, don't be afraid to take the cores at his pace and to add hands-on where you can.  My son happens to do very well with videos, so we use lots of kid vids for teaching: Magic School Bus, The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot about That, Sid the Science Kid, Liberty's Kids, Beginner's Bible, etc.

HTH,

Sandwich

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Sandwich in Wi

Also, I guess, I'm not sure what kinesthic/visual curriculum you will find for him.  I'm sure it's out there.  I'm just not aware of it.

But for now because he is so little, I think I'd focus on reading and math and picture books and then as he gets older, maybe use your dd's core as a guide for topics you can pursue with him in a more kinesthic/visual way.  If she's reading about Ancient Egypt, get a picture book about it, or a video or an app.  Build a lego pyramid, stamp some hieroglyphs, mummify an apple.  There are lots and lots of elementary age projects to help things come alive for him as you go along. So I think you can still use SL as a base for what to learn with him, you just might have to pull in some different resources.

Also, and I don't know anything about the diagnoses he was given, but the Kindle's read-aloud feature can be set to slow or fast voice, and if a slower than normal reading pace helps him, perhaps in the future that is a resource you can use. Just thinking out loud....

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KWaters

Wow.  Thanks so much for your detailed response and suggestions.  I can't tell you how helpful it is to hear that another person has been there and that it's okay to do what works best for my kid.  He's already reading some and memorizing math facts so we will just go with what inspires him. In your post, when you said "focus on learning to read first" it was like a lightbulb moment for me.  I'm pressuring myself to make school this well-rounded experience and that's just not how it's gonna work.  Can ya tell I'm a rookie?  =)  I have been looking at the preschool-aged cores for him and think they will be a good fit.  He loves to be read to if there are pictures.  I think I was feeling unsure of starting him there because of the age references, but if it works it works right?  

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Hauxa Mom

You may be interested in the book Discover Your Child's Learning Style by Mariaemma Willis and Victoria Hodson. It covers the various learning styles, and then gives some ideas for curricula that are good for that style. Perhaps your library has it, or you could request it for inter-library loan if they don't have it.

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girlygirl

Have you thought of combining Timberdoodle with Sonlight? We are planning on doing Timberdoodle here for PreK over the summer with my son who will be 4 in March. It is a much more hands on type of learning. Maybe a balance of the two will help to strengthen some weaknesses while catering to his visual needs. Just a thought. :)

 

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KWaters
13 hours ago, Hauxa Mom said:

You may be interested in the book Discover Your Child's Learning Style by Mariaemma Willis and Victoria Hodson. It covers the various learning styles, and then gives some ideas for curricula that are good for that style. Perhaps your library has it, or you could request it for inter-library loan if they don't have it.

Thank you!  I will look into it!

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KWaters
2 hours ago, girlygirl said:

Have you thought of combining Timberdoodle with Sonlight? We are planning on doing Timberdoodle here for PreK over the summer with my son who will be 4 in March. It is a much more hands on type of learning. Maybe a balance of the two will help to strengthen some weaknesses while catering to his visual needs. Just a thought. :)

 

I just heard about Timberdoodle a couple of weeks ago and looked at it briefly.  I think some of it would work well for him.  I think I just wasn't sure how exactly to go about combining them without spending an arm and a leg.  

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Sandwich in Wi
On 2/15/2017 at 0:45 PM, KWaters said:

Wow.  Thanks so much for your detailed response and suggestions.  I can't tell you how helpful it is to hear that another person has been there and that it's okay to do what works best for my kid.  He's already reading some and memorizing math facts so we will just go with what inspires him. In your post, when you said "focus on learning to read first" it was like a lightbulb moment for me.  I'm pressuring myself to make school this well-rounded experience and that's just not how it's gonna work.  Can ya tell I'm a rookie?  =)  I have been looking at the preschool-aged cores for him and think they will be a good fit.  He loves to be read to if there are pictures.  I think I was feeling unsure of starting him there because of the age references, but if it works it works right?  

Yes!  That's what I love about homeschooling, is that I can do just what works for my child and what he needs.  He's not getting left behind because he's not part of the herd.  That said, I have another one for whom I think I know what is best and all we do is butt heads.  sigh.  I think public school is in his future.

44 minutes ago, KWaters said:

I just heard about Timberdoodle a couple of weeks ago and looked at it briefly.  I think some of it would work well for him.  I think I just wasn't sure how exactly to go about combining them without spending an arm and a leg.  

I love Timberdoodle!  We mostly use it as extras and I mostly order it for birthday and Christmas gifts (many of which Uncle will give, since he never has any idea what to buy anyway!  He prefers I pick it out and he just give me the money and wraps the gift!  LOL)  Remember that science at this age, and actually most of elementary school, can be TOTALLY hands on and videos and real life and never needs to come from a written page.  History is a little trickier to make hands-on, but it can be done.  One of the things I loved about the Well-Trained Mind was that they said in elementary school, you are just building pegs for them to hang information on.  Egypt built the pyramids.  Rome had gladiators and the coliseum.  The Phoenicians made purple dye out of snails.  Later, you'll flesh all that out when they are older. (Sadly, that was about all of the WTM that worked for me!  Then back to SL I went! LOL)

Blessings,

Sandwich

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girlygirl
22 hours ago, KWaters said:

I just heard about Timberdoodle a couple of weeks ago and looked at it briefly.  I think some of it would work well for him.  I think I just wasn't sure how exactly to go about combining them without spending an arm and a leg.  

I totally understand this. We were lucky and my MIL gifted Timberdoodle to my husband and I as our Christmas present. I would look just at what interests you from Timberdoodle and then add in readers/books from SL. Maybe used or library??

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christina0125

I’d love to hear how this last year has gone for you! :)  How old is your son?

My daughter is recovering from Autism Spectrum Disorder, with one of her main struggles being Auditory Processing Disorder.  She is 6 years old now, and we are 1/2 way through P4/5.  We started P3/4 almost 2 1/2 years ago, and have been working at our own pace (her 4 year old brother is doing them with her).  One thing I’ve noticed is that at first she only wanted to flip pages in books and look at the pictures.  Then in her growth she wanted a few stories read to her.  She LOVED hearing the same stories over and over.  I believe that knowing what was coming and hearing what she was expecting really helped to strengthen her auditory processing.  Some days she would want to read lots of books, and let me add new stories in, and some days we only read 1 or 2 of her favorites and then we moved on to hands on learning activities.  I’ve learned that she definitely has days when she’s more inclined to stretch and grow in her auditory learning, and there are other days when I get to stretch in my creativity. ;)

One thing that her neurodevelopmentalist told us is that the short term auditory processing is extremely important in learning to read with phonics (you need to be able to hold several different sounds/pieces of information in your short term memory and then put them together to sound out the word).  Sight words can be easier until they have an auditory short term memory of at least 3 or 4.   Just curious if you’ve noticed anything with this with your son. :) 

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Sandwich in Wi
On 1/8/2018 at 2:59 PM, christina0125 said:

I’d love to hear how this last year has gone for you! :)  How old is your son?

My daughter is recovering from Autism Spectrum Disorder, with one of her main struggles being Auditory Processing Disorder.  She is 6 years old now, and we are 1/2 way through P4/5.  We started P3/4 almost 2 1/2 years ago, and have been working at our own pace (her 4 year old brother is doing them with her).  One thing I’ve noticed is that at first she only wanted to flip pages in books and look at the pictures.  Then in her growth she wanted a few stories read to her.  She LOVED hearing the same stories over and over.  I believe that knowing what was coming and hearing what she was expecting really helped to strengthen her auditory processing.  Some days she would want to read lots of books, and let me add new stories in, and some days we only read 1 or 2 of her favorites and then we moved on to hands on learning activities.  I’ve learned that she definitely has days when she’s more inclined to stretch and grow in her auditory learning, and there are other days when I get to stretch in my creativity. ;)

One thing that her neurodevelopmentalist told us is that the short term auditory processing is extremely important in learning to read with phonics (you need to be able to hold several different sounds/pieces of information in your short term memory and then put them together to sound out the word).  Sight words can be easier until they have an auditory short term memory of at least 3 or 4.   Just curious if you’ve noticed anything with this with your son. :) 

This was definitely my son, too!  When he was little, there were some days I thought I'd die if I had to read a story for literally the 300th time!  But it did help to build his auditory strength and he is listening to long chapter books now.  We're doing Core C and he just turned 13.  He is loving The Penderwicks!  I love that we can just move along at his pace and help him to slowly, but surely, grow.

Blessings, Sandwich

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