LightOfGrace

Dyslexia Supplement/Intervention

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LightOfGrace

I think my eight year old may have dyslexia as they read at a early kindergarten level and write most of their letters wrong. Has anyone used All About Reading as an intervention?  Has anyone used Verticy as an intervention? Did you use thes as a supplement to Sonlight language arts or as a replacement?

I am leaning more towards AAR because it seems more interactive and parent led and has some good samples of parents and students using it on YouTube. However Verticy has more modalities of learning, i.e. Internet supplements as well as only positive reviews that I can find but no first hand videos except for ones from the company.  Please give some advice because I have to make a choice early this week, price is not a problem as the district will be paying since it is part of an evaluation for special education and an iep.

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Robin E.

I have no experience with Verticy, but a quick google search for it shows me that it's reading and spelling instruction is based on the Orton-Gillingham approach, and OG is the gold standard for dyslexia intervention, so that is good.

However, All About Reading and All About Spelling are also based on the OG approach and that I do have experience with them. Four of my five kids are dyslexic, and all four have benefited greatly from All About Spelling. Two have also benefited from All About Reading, but the only reason the other two didn't is because it wasn't published in time to help my other two. I have no doubt that they would have benefited from it as well. They are super easy to use. I open the student's review box, flip to his or her bookmark, and start. I can teach 3 different levels of AAS and 1 level of AAR each morning, without feeling like that is all I'm doing or having to be super organized. Yet, the review boxes allow me to fully customize to each student's unique needs, so that we only review what they need to review and waste no time reviewing what they have mastered.

I have used AAR and AAS to teach what they teach, reading and spelling. When the kids are ready for writing, then we have used Sonlight's writing at times. I used SL's writing more closely with my older two kids, but it is not working out with my younger three. This is because I am doing Sonlight much more loosely now, and the SL's LA is tied so closely to the Readers that if we skip or change a Reader or go faster or slower than Sonlight's pace then the LA assignments don't work. For a while I kept trying to juggle SL's LA to fit our more "look at the IG once every week or two" way of doing Sonlight, but I have given up. We will be starting Institute for Excellence in Writing next month.

Anyway, since both AAR and Verticy are based on the same approach (Orton-Gillingham) they will have a lot of things in common. However, that frees you up to look beyond the research and approach and look at other things like cost, user support, how well it will mesh with your family and homeschool, and so on. One thing I have noticed with some OG programs other than All About Reading: they don't always have books to go with them, forcing the child to practice reading using only lists and word sheets. One of the best things about AAR, to me, is their beautiful Readers that are "real" books, hardbound, with interesting stories and wonderful illustrations. I don't know if Verticy offers books, but AAR's books really make a huge impact on kids developing smooth, fluent reading and also an enjoyment of reading.

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LightOfGrace

Thank you for such a heartfelt response. I enjoyed reading all the information regarding AAR. The school does not offer it with AAS u till after the initial intervention for some reason. The school also promoted Verticy very heavily so we are going with that for now. We can use it for the rest of the school year, independently over the summer, then for two months with the school in the fall. After that the first stage of the intervention will be complete and an in person evaluation will be done to see if she is reading on level. If not we can choose another intervention or stay with Verticy.

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manyblessings

For my daughter who has an official dyslexic dx the OG methods did not help. The specialist recommended using the method but it simply did not help at all. My daughter actually knew all phonetic sounds but when she attempts to blend her mind cannot do it, the sounds move around and then the outcome is a jumbled mess. We ended up having to use a program called Quick Reads through the school system to help her and now that her word bank is so good she can read two grade levels above.

I don't mean to take away from your question about AAR. I simply wanted to offer another view before you attempt investing time or money in the AAR or AAS programs. 

Edited by manyblessings

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Little Women

I would recommend starting with the book Overcoming Dyslexia, by Sally Shaywitz. She talks about how to tell if they are dyslexic at various age levels (it's not all about whether they can read or not), and she talks about research into the best ways to combat it.    There are different types of dyslexia, and the same method won't necessarily work for all of them, but some work for a greater percentage.    For this reason, I would start with All About Reading, then if that isn't enough go to Barton (can be bought used and resold, which helps some with the cost), and then if that's not enough, research other approaches that might be non-phonetic as suggested above.    It does take intensive time, though--you will need to be willing to follow through, because they will not teach it to themselves. 

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learnin'mom

I used Barton to begin with then discovered AAR & AAS and switched. Basically AAR is Barton for kids. Truly isn't much difference imo.

I have two dyslexic children (so far) and I would say they are now reading close to grade level, however their spelling is still pretty bad. They are ages 14 and 11. I decided to give AAS a break and switched them to Spelling you See just because they were growing to hate the AAS.

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kolamum

Have you had your child tested for dyslexia? A specialist will give you specific suggestions for that which will best suit. I'm not saying you can't try something else in the mean time by any stretch of the imagination, but the sooner you get a diagnoses the easier the road ahead becomes as you learn the ins & outs of the diagnosis. ;) Having said that.. my children do not have dyslexia but do the things you mentioned. They have Visual Processing Disorder which is also known as Scotopic Sensitive Disorder. It took us 7 years to get a diagnosis, but once we did the uphill battle has become more of a downhill slide because the helps are now in place & they can make progress. ;)

I don't know about the USA, but where we live some of the same helps my children use for VPD/SSS are what would be given for a child with dyslexia.. It might be worth getting a diagnosis. ;)

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