my cup of tea & me

Hmmmm...Mom was right!!

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my cup of tea & me

Dd21 has to meet with the head of her department each semester to have direction in what classes to take next.  I'm not sure if he is a control freak or if it is just more complicated when you transfer from a CC.  During her Spring meeting she was told she needed to take Pre-cal.    I thought this sounded way off.  1)Before she went to her 4 year university she had finished her math requirements at CC after consulting the same man via email. 2) She wasn't even required to take College Algebra, so why move her on to Pre-cal?  3) She is a graphic design major-why would she need Pre-calculus? 

When I pointed this out to her she was very adamant that she was taking Pre-cal this summer at CC.   I think part of this is fueled by her having a lot of friends who are math majors and a bit of wanna-be-like them.  

Yesterday was her first day with this class.   It is an online class, but she drove to CC to work on it so help would be nearby.   She came home hours & hours later and pulled out her laptop.  She was so miserable being back in math after a year off that she looked at her University's list of what she has left to take.    There isn't a math listed at all!  She doesn't have to take this class!     She tried calling the professor, but he didn't answer.    I thought it over & told her to NOT contact him about it.   He can be a jerk, so why give him the chance to change her requirements officially in the Uni records?    She also discovered another unnecessary class for fall and a necessary one.  By contacting professors directly, she has changed her schedule to match the online requirements and will be better off all the way around.   

Most likely he won't even remember telling her to take this class, and if he pushes it she has already printed off the page showing it wasn't required.    Last year he told her she needed to take two years of foreign language.   Once again, it didn't make sense & the requirement faded away somehow.   

So, today, Mom was right...and we'll be saving $1000 this summer.   Woot!!   

 

 

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Bendxap

Just goes to show that the "experts" don't always know everything!

I've told this here recently but it applies here, too, I think: I had four years of Spanish in high school and when I went to the state university, I had to take a placement test for Spanish. I tested on the 300/junior level. When I was signing up for classes, the adviser that was helping us recommended taking a 200 level course because "college courses are much harder than high school." Fine. About 3/4 of the way through that 200 level course, I talked to the TA who was teaching the class and some how it came out that I'd written a research paper all in Spanish my senior year. The TA said, "What?! What are you doing in this class?!"

(Later I translated the paper back into English and turned it in for an art class--it was on El Greco--and got a 4++ on it!)

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my cup of tea & me
7 minutes ago, Bendxap said:

Just goes to show that the "experts" don't always know everything!

I've told this here recently but it applies here, too, I think: I had four years of Spanish in high school and when I went to the state university, I had to take a placement test for Spanish. I tested on the 300/junior level. When I was signing up for classes, the adviser that was helping us recommended taking a 200 level course because "college courses are much harder than high school." Fine. About 3/4 of the way through that 200 level course, I talked to the TA who was teaching the class and some how it came out that I'd written a research paper all in Spanish my senior year. The TA said, "What?! What are you doing in this class?!"

(Later I translated the paper back into English and turned it in for an art class--it was on El Greco--and got a 4++ on it!)

What a great example.   

From my own teaching/classroom experience I have a similar example to yours.  At the beginning of our school year as Kindergarten teachers, we tested students for placement using a certain test which I have now forgotten the name of.    In this test it only presented about two words to the student to read along with lots of other markers for placement.   I remember one of the words was simply "it".   This student missed the word, and he was placed in Kindergarten.   If his parents had communicated with me I would have known he was already reading first grade level books, and he would have been placed in the pre-first class.  It took a painfully long time for this story to unfold, but eventually they asked me why he was in my class.  In addition to his placement test results, I had been told by the principal that they had requested me.   I mentioned that to them, and they politely said that they liked me, but hadn't requested me.  Then I put together the next part of the puzzle.  If you can visualize, this boy was a big country boy.   His parents were big too.   Not just tall, but BIG.  They sent him extra food for his school day.   He weighted 130 pounds.   I weighed, like, 115 pounds at the time.   Turns out my principal found it funny to put the biggest boy with the smallest Kindergarten teacher.   I guess it beats my first year of teaching (then 1st grade) in which the same principal gave me and my co-teacher a list of 40 students to divide between ourselves.   She already knew all the students, so she stacked her class with the best students and left me with a lot of students who weren't even ready for first grade.   

Dd's professor/department head is too busy, too arrogant, and really sold us on a program that isn't all that he said it was (internships! entrepreneurship!) .   It is a hard lesson to learn that professionals often have their own agendas.    Ds18 learned a similar lesson when he wrote a conservative English paper for a liberal-minded professor his first semester of dual-enrollment.     <_<

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Bendxap
15 minutes ago, my cup of tea & me said:

What a great example.   

From my own teaching/classroom experience I have a similar example to yours.  At the beginning of our school year as Kindergarten teachers, we tested students for placement using a certain test which I have now forgotten the name of.    In this test it only presented about two words to the student to read along with lots of other markers for placement.   I remember one of the words was simply "it".   This student missed the word, and he was placed in Kindergarten.   If his parents had communicated with me I would have known he was already reading first grade level books, and he would have been placed in the pre-first class.  It took a painfully long time for this story to unfold, but eventually they asked me why he was in my class.  In addition to his placement test results, I had been told by the principal that they had requested me.   I mentioned that to them, and they politely said that they liked me, but hadn't requested me.  Then I put together the next part of the puzzle.  If you can visualize, this boy was a big country boy.   His parents were big too.   Not just tall, but BIG.  They sent him extra food for his school day.   He weighted 130 pounds.   I weighed, like, 115 pounds at the time.   Turns out my principal found it funny to put the biggest boy with the smallest Kindergarten teacher.  

It might have been "funny" for a short-term joke but not when considering his year in kindergarten and your year of teaching.

And your story reminds me of our boys' kindergarten days: Older's birthday is early September and just made the cut-off to do (public) kindergarten when he was turning 5. Background info: kinders here in Mexico start at 3 years old, so there's a 1st year of kinder, a 2nd year, and a 3rd year. We'd decided to just do 3rd year because it didn't seem necessary to do all three. (Since then I've realized that the three years are really valuable for many people in our area who don't have books, puzzles, crayons, etc. to work on all the pre-kinder skills.) Older did fine in kinder, in fact, found it mostly pretty easy. I was a little annoyed at kindergartens having homework but otherwise it was good.

I was tempted to not put Younger in public kinder because I was then homeschooling Older and the hassle of taking Younger to kinder and picking him up at specific times didn't appeal to me. But he wouldn't speak Spanish very much and so to kinder he went.

Soon after he started kinder, he said that there'd been a birthday party for one of his classmates who was turning SEVEN! That's when I figured out that the two groups that made up 3rd year were sorted out by ages. Younger, whose birthday is in July (so had just turned 5), had been put in the older group. I went to talk to the kinder principal and she said, no, he's in the right group. So I let it go, assuming that they put him in that group on the basis of Older having found his class (he was in the younger age group) so easy. (My boys don't stand out too much in Mexico but I certainly do so I'm quite sure they remembered me and Older when they decided to put Younger in the older age class.)

15 minutes ago, my cup of tea & me said:

I guess it beats my first year of teaching (then 1st grade) in which the same principal gave me and my co-teacher a list of 40 students to divide between ourselves.   She already knew all the students, so she stacked her class with the best students and left me with a lot of students who weren't even ready for first grade.  

Seems a rather unprofessional decision by the principal. (not that i know anything about how public schools are run!) I have to say I'm not surprised by the other teacher's solution, unfortunately. I bet it was a hard year for you.

15 minutes ago, my cup of tea & me said:

Dd's profesor/department head is too busy, too arrogant, and really sold us on a program that isn't all that he said it was (internships! entrepreneurship!) .   It is a hard lesson to learn that professionals often have their own agendas.    Ds18 learned a similar lesson when he wrote a conservative English paper for a liberal-minded professor his first semester of dual-enrollment.     <_<

Yes, hard life lessons. Here's to stronger adults as they work through the hard life lessons!

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my cup of tea & me

Addition to the story:   she cancelled the class, but if you cancel on the day classes start, you lose 25%.   So, I am getting a refund less 25%.   She offered to pay me for the 25% and I didn't argue with her about that.    I know she wishes I had said, "No, that's okay.", but I'm not going to do that.   B)  Expensive lesson to learn.  Actually several lessons, first of which is listen to your mother even if you think you are an adult!

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Bendxap
7 hours ago, my cup of tea & me said:

Addition to the story:   she cancelled the class, but if you cancel on the day classes start, you lose 25%.   So, I am getting a refund less 25%.   She offered to pay me for the 25% and I didn't argue with her about that.    I know she wishes I had said, "No, that's okay.", but I'm not going to do that.   B)  Expensive lesson to learn.  Actually several lessons, first of which is listen to your mother even if you think you are an adult!

Good for you! I don't like teaching those lessons but it's worth it in the long run. 

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Mazurka
9 hours ago, Bendxap said:

 

(Later I translated the paper back into English and turned it in for an art class--it was on El Greco--and got a 4++ on it!)

My research paper in Spanish was on an artist, too, although I did mine in college. The artist I chose was Zurbaran, an artist associated with Sevilla where I studied. Although I really like El Greco, too. I'm not sure why I picked Zurbaran, because I really like Murillo better - he is another artist associated with Sevilla.

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Mazurka

I just recently read an article encouraging homeschool parents to keep the role of guidance counselor through high school dual enrollment, community college and then 4 year college. The article indicated that most of the advisors can only advise properly on their little niche, and that if you want to save money you'll keep yourself informed on what your student needs. Makes sense.

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Bendxap
34 minutes ago, Mazurka said:

My research paper in Spanish was on an artist, too, although I did mine in college. The artist I chose was Zurbaran, an artist associated with Sevilla where I studied. Although I really like El Greco, too. I'm not sure why I picked Zurbaran, because I really like Murillo better - he is another artist associated with Sevilla.

I've never heard of Zurbaran, Murillo sounds familiar. I can't remember how I knew enough about El Greco to choose him. It was an interesting study, though!

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Mazurka

 

28 minutes ago, Bendxap said:

I've never heardof Zurbaran, Murillo sounds familiar. I can't remember how I knew enough about El Greco to choose him. It was an interesting study, though!

He is known for his beautiful pictures of children in everyday life. Here is a link to one of his most famous pictures, El Buen Pastor.

I can't get the link to work on my iPad. Oh well. Google if you want to see it - it's a beautiful depiction of Christ as a child in the role of The Good Shepherd.

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Bendxap
51 minutes ago, Mazurka said:

 

He is known for his beautiful pictures of children in everyday life. Here is a link to one of his most famous pictures, El Buen Pastor.

I can't get the link to work on my iPad. Oh well. Google if you want to see it - it's a beautiful depiction of Christ as a child in the role of The Good Shepherd.

Wow! His paintings are beautiful!

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