KylaSR

10th Grade Son with Auditory Processing Disorder - Need Recommendations

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KylaSR

My son was diagnosed with Auditory Processing Disorder, ADHD, ODD and Dysgraphia when he was entering 8th grade.  We have done speech therapy and also spent a year doing Fast Forward.  We have seen such an improvement but still have a ways to go.  In my research, I have learned that reading is critical to his growth in his language delay (just as children who are on target academically).  His biggest challenge is processing what he reads and remembering what he reads besides, the last line before he stops.  So, I have used Sonlight for my other two children (one that just graduated from college and one currently in college) and have always loved it.  I have had a hard time getting rid of my reading material.  Looking over the curriculum for him for next year and doing American History, I  would love to hear from anyone that has a child close to the age as my son who did or has done Sonlight history/literature reading that has APD and your success/struggles/challenges and how you handled.  I am thinking of doing every other book for history reading and literature reading as to not overwhelm him, but yet have this nagging feeling as a 10th grader I want him to push harder since college life will not be so flexible.

Any and all input/recommendations or words of wisdom would be greatly appreciated.

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Merry

My kids had various challenges, including several that you mentioned. I didn't look at the high school years as "do it like college now." I looked at them as my opportunity to scaffold each child towards the skills they would need in college. I didn't try to get through everything scheduled in the Sonlight cores, science, etc... Instead, I focused on teaching study skills, self-accommodating, note-taking skills, how to help yourself learn and remember things, writing skills (huge for kids with dysgraphia), listening skills (we still did read-alouds. College instructors will lecture, sometimes with visuals, sometimes not--I felt read-alouds were going to be the best way to help prepare my kids for that). 

Don't be afraid to spend more time on a book (reading, discussing, understanding, synthesizing), to retake tests if needed, to spend extra time studying for tests (we never got through all of the modules in an Apologia science book because we spent extra time really learning how to study using that subject), how to take notes from a text book (I focused on this skill with history and had my kids learn how to do T-notes--which is like this example of Cornell Notes).

But on the flip side--don't feel you have to analyze and dig into everything. It's fine to just read a lit book and enjoy it! Some books we discussed in depth, some not much at all. 

Break papers down into smaller pieces and really work with this aspect for a student with dysgraphia. If you can help him thoroughly understand the process on a few papers, that's better than doing a greater quantity but never really working through the process and helping him know how to do all of the steps. 

Use the high school years to gradually work towards helping him understand how to schedule his time, how not to procrastinate and so on. I wasn't able to do this until senior year with my kids because they really needed the stair-steps along the way--but I used a half-credit health course to let them see what it was like to get a syllabus for the semester with due-dates for projects and tests, no guidelines for how to break down the reading, writing, and studying--and let them sink or swim. Partway through the semester, I then let them see where there procrastination was leading and made them do what I had "suggested" they do early on--use a planner to come up with a plan for how to get caught up. Feeling what it's like to have everything come upon them at once can be a good teachable moment for them to experience before a college class! That didn't prevent all procrastination in college, LOL, but I think it helped them prevent a lot of it. 

Anyway, HTH some! Enjoy these high school years and the times of discussion with your son. That's valuable time well-spent, and good prep for college--more important than doing every last reading or assignment.

Oh, and btw...college teachers don't always get to everything either! Sometimes they push back their schedules or even drop things!

Edited by Merry

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