club190

Q for international moms re college

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club190

Hi International mommas,

I've been working with a student for a bit of time on his composition skills to help him with his ACTs.  Well, he did AMAZING on them and I told him he should watch the mail because colleges will likely be lining up to talk to him and … crickets!  What's wrong?  Do colleges not woo international students?  This kid got a 35 on his ACT!!!  (With 2 of the tests coming in at 36 and the other 2 at 35) I don't understand it.  This kid is a math Olympiad!  What gives?  What advice do you have for me to give to this boy's mom?  He is an American citizen, but he lives in India, if that makes a difference.  He wants to come to the US to go to college but with a score like that, he should be fast tracking to some great scholarship opportunities.  Or, are those just geared to kids in the US?

Thanks for the insight,

Chris

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Bendxap

So you are saying that he hasn't heard from any (or very few) colleges?

For what it's worth, our sons found that every college and university defines "international" in its own way. He may be considered international because he lives in India BUT he might not be considered international because he's a US citizen. As I remember, Older was considered international at his college (private, Christian) because he lived in Mexico. (He's also a Mexican citizen but to apply to the college as a Mexican meant having a certain visa and other paperwork, which he obviously didn't need because he is also a US citizen.) Younger was not considered international at his university (private, secular) because he was a US citizen.

That said, Younger did receive an invitation to apply for the science honor's program at a private, Christian university. (I'm not sure if he had applied there or not when he got the invitation. I can ask him, if it's important to you.) Younger knows a lot about science but isn't really interested in that much. The only thing we can figure is that his ACT and/or SAT scores were good enough in science to warrant the invitation.

(By the way, when he was researching the invitation, he saw that he could get a full ride scholarship so he decided to apply. I suggested that he might have to have a science major if he were accepted. "That's ok. I'll get a free ride!" So he worked on the application. Then he came to me, "I have to write a 500 word essay on why I want to be in the program." "Why do you want to be in the program?" "For the money." "OK. Then figure out how to say that in different ways until you get 500 words." And that was the end of the application.)

As far as advice, I'd say to start applying to the colleges he wants to go to. Make sure his scores are included.

Also, many schools are looking for "diversity" so I would play up the fact that he's lived there X number of years, knows the culture, language, or whatever will make him attractive to the "diversity" police. (Our sons not only grew up in Mexico but are Mexican/Hispanic, as well as Native American, and are bilingual and bicultural, and have a smattering of their Native American heritage language and culture.)

Hopefully others will be able to help you more. Our sons applied to three or four colleges each and were accepted by the ones that they each preferred and that's where they went. We are pretty low-key.

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holding_fast

I don't have experience, but I would have assumed that we will have to be the ones to pursue colleges, rather than the other way around. It's a leg up for him when he applies, but I wouldn't wait or expect to be contacted first.

Did he give an international address? I imagine most college mailings go out to just the domestic addresses.

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TomaXlaters

When he took his ACTs, did he check the box to opt-in to marketing mailings and email?

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kolamum

It's unlikely he'll hear from colleges from afar unless he applies to them. It gets tricky as an Expat.. at least where we live it does, in fact our gang can't even take the ACT unless we travel a fair distance & we were told they can't get the extra time they should be allotted due to their VPD because we are overseas. Soo... 

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Gilead

My nephew who went to high school in Spain was forced to take the TESOL test (for speakers of english as a 2nd language) when applying to Canadian university system, despite coming from an English-speaking home with dual US/Canadian citizenship. They really didn't know what to do with him. He ended up going to a Canadian CC because the university couldn't figure out how to process him. So weird, but a happy thing because he had time to adapt to Canada (where he'd never lived) and working (no chance of a p/t job for him in Spain) and saved lots of $$ on tuition and fees.

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lianin
On 9/4/2018 at 3:05 PM, Gilead said:

My nephew who went to high school in Spain was forced to take the TESOL test (for speakers of english as a 2nd language) when applying to Canadian university system, despite coming from an English-speaking home with dual US/Canadian citizenship. They really didn't know what to do with him. He ended up going to a Canadian CC because the university couldn't figure out how to process him. So weird, but a happy thing because he had time to adapt to Canada (where he'd never lived) and working (no chance of a p/t job for him in Spain) and saved lots of $$ on tuition and fees.

Wow, I'm surprised! I went to high school in another country (Peru) and my US college didn't blink an eye. I had a number of Canadian classmates who went on to colleges in Canada, now I'm curious if they had trouble too.

Oh! I just realized something. My high school was English-speaking and followed US school system requirements - I bet that made a huge difference.

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Gilead
On 9/8/2018 at 9:38 AM, lianin said:

Wow, I'm surprised! I went to high school in another country (Peru) and my US college didn't blink an eye. I had a number of Canadian classmates who went on to colleges in Canada, now I'm curious if they had trouble too.

Oh! I just realized something. My high school was English-speaking and followed US school system requirements - I bet that made a huge difference.

Yep, nephew grew up in W. Africa and his parents moved to Spain when he was entering high school. He went to school in spanish, so now he speaks 4 languages (Spanish, French, English, and Pulaar).

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