Cathy_Ohio

Singapore typical day/week

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Cathy_Ohio

Hi There,

 

Can you tell me what a typical day or week looks like for your first or second grader using Singapore?  Do you teach at the board?  Read them the textbook?  Assign them workbook pages to work on independently?  That type of thing. 

 

Thanks!

Cathy

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CJinOAX

We do math every day. Usually it involves talking through a couple pages in the textbook and doing the example and practice problems there orally together (sometimes with manipulatives). The At Home Instructors Guides have additional activities if your kid has trouble with a concept, but so far just doing the textbook together is usually enough. Then I assign a couple pages in the workbook (the text tells you which ones correlate with each section) and intensive practice book. The workbook goes along with what we just did. We work a little behind in the intensive practice book for review, and because it often mixes harder problems in with easier ones within a given topic, so it's better to have finished all the instruction for a particular topic in the textbook before assigning the pages for that topic in the IP book. Sometimes you come up to a practice page in the text or a review page in the workbook so there is no "instruction" those days. I tell them the textbook practice pages are quizzes and the workbook reviews are tests and I don't give help on those and I "grade" them. Most of the time they can do the workbook independently. The IP has some harder problems and sometimes they need help with some of those.

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Shell Lee

Hi There,

 

Can you tell me what a typical day or week looks like for your first or second grader using Singapore?  Do you teach at the board?  Read them the textbook?  Assign them workbook pages to work on independently?  That type of thing. 

 

Thanks!

Cathy

 

 

 

I use the Home Instructor Guides (HIG) and follow their schedule.

 

I begin a math lesson by doing the Teaching Activities in the HIG. I have some lap sized white boards we use during these lessons, as well as the other manipulatives. These boards are listed in the front of the HIG where the use of selected manipulatives are listed; along with multilink cubes, Base-10 set, counters, playing cards, etc. We use these to complete the Teaching Activities.

 

Then I'll look at the Reinforcement and/or Extension activity that the HIG includes after the Teaching Activity. Sometimes we do those and sometimes not.

 

Next we open the Textbook and do the Tasks the HIG refers to. Interestingly, they are not always in the order that one would do if just working straight through the textbook. (There have been a few times where the schedule in the HIG does not follow the order in the textbook, and I have agreed that it works better to do it the way the HIG scheduled it.) I use the textbook work as a way to gauge if my student is ready for independent work. We won't necessarily do all of the Textbook tasks. Sometimes there is a problem set of very similar problems and I may have my student do only three or so if they are demonstrating a solid understanding. I use the textbook to determine if my student is ready to work independently. I think of it a guided practice.

 

The workbook is next and I want it done independently. If there is a question, I will refer us back to the textbook to look at a similar problem...or make up my own.

 

Those three activities (Teaching Activity, Textbook Tasks, Workbook), constitute our Math Lesson. I budget about 30 minutes for that and my student has my dedicated attention for those 30 minutes.  After the thirty minute Math Lesson we switch to a new subject, but math is not over.

 

I have two more math mini-sessions scheduled in the school day, each about 15 minutes long; one for Math Word Problem, and one for math Extra-Practice/facts. I put these two in the Independent Work section of their day; where they don't have dibs on access to me. I use the supplemental books from Singapore for these; the Word Problem book, the Extra-Practice books, the Mental Math practices in the appendix of the HIG, and also time on a Flashmaster. I want this time to work as a review (and to be as independent as possible) and so my dc are working about half a level behind where they are in their Math Lessons.

 

By the end of the average day they have done one hour of math; one 30 minute session with me, and two 15 minute sessions on their own. I found that trying to do all the math at once would not work for us. For one of my dc in particular, after about 25 minutes, any math thought that should only take just a few minutes will end up taking an agonizingly long time to accomplish. I finally wised-up and began working around this phenomenon instead of against it.

 

In re-reading this, I would say that this fits the second grade work well. For a first-grader, I may cut back the time on everything slightly. Maybe a 20-25 minute math lesson, and 10 minutes each on the word problems and extra-practice/facts. It would depend on the child.

 

First-graders would definitely benefit from a heavier emphasis on manipulates, and less on the supplemental books. The activities in the HIG for 1A and 1B are really excellent and will help lay the groundwork for intuitive mathematical thinking all down the line. I have a masters in math education and I am grieved whenever I hear of these teaching activities getting a short shift.

 

I hope that helps some, and I'm happy to clarify or expound. Good for you for taking a look at how other homeschools do their math time. I hope you can pick pieces here and there to help you put together something that works for you and your unique situation. That lovely babe in your signature must make everything so much more interesting!! :)

Edited by Shell Lee
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Cathy_Ohio

Wow Shelly! That was so helpful.  I love details like this!   For your independent work, do you set a timer?  Or do you just assign enough problems to fill an aprox. 15 minute time slot? 

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Shell Lee

Wow Shelly! That was so helpful. I love details like this! For your independent work, do you set a timer? Or do you just assign enough problems to fill an aprox. 15 minute time slot?

One of my dc needs the timer and one doesn't. For the one who uses the timer, I do check to see if an appropriate amount was accomplished; sometimes it is one section, sometimes two, sometimes a page. I take the type of problems into account.

I suppose I use a whichever-comes-first expectation; do this page (or whatever seems reasonable), but stop if it takes longer than 15 min, given that no dilly-dallying is going on.

I do use a timer on my math lessons because I have a tendency to go too long. And although I follow the schedule in the HIG, I will allow extra days for lessons if need be. If the workbook lesson doesn't get finished, despite diligent work, I use the next day's math lesson to revisit some of the teaching activities briefly and then give time to finish the workbook. Reinforcement and/or Extension activities round out these days nicely.

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flowergirl159

Wow Shelley, your posts have helped me to see Singapore in a different way. I have a not so mathy child in 3A/B and a mathy child in 2A. Usually, the younger doesn't need me to teach her any new concepts and just 'gets on' with her workbook. I have hardly ever used the HIG, seemed like too much work for me. After reading your post about spending 30mins or so with child, first teaching from HIG and following lesson plans, I tried it. At the time, my older child didn't like it because she wasn't getting anything tangible done (ie workbook pages), but in the afternoon she came and told me how much she liked doing math that way. What we usually do, is the three all start maths at same time, the older are working to complete 2 or 3 pages in their workbook, if they need help or a new concept taught, I am right there. Then we move along to our LA activities. I love this way of doing math and am 100% sure that this will help my older daughter. But I am not sure though, how to fit in doing 30mins alone with each of the older two. I don't really see how I can fit this in each day. Is there any way I can tweak it? Do the HIG lesson plans take 30mins each?

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Shell Lee

Wow Shelley, your posts have helped me to see Singapore in a different way. I have a not so mathy child in 3A/B and a mathy child in 2A. Usually, the younger doesn't need me to teach her any new concepts and just 'gets on' with her workbook. I have hardly ever used the HIG, seemed like too much work for me. After reading your post about spending 30mins or so with child, first teaching from HIG and following lesson plans, I tried it. At the time, my older child didn't like it because she wasn't getting anything tangible done (ie workbook pages), but in the afternoon she came and told me how much she liked doing math that way. What we usually do, is the three all start maths at same time, the older are working to complete 2 or 3 pages in their workbook, if they need help or a new concept taught, I am right there. Then we move along to our LA activities. I love this way of doing math and am 100% sure that this will help my older daughter. But I am not sure though, how to fit in doing 30mins alone with each of the older two. I don't really see how I can fit this in each day. Is there any way I can tweak it? Do the HIG lesson plans take 30mins each?

 

 

Do the HIG lesson plans take 30mins each?

 

No. The HIG lessons do not usually take 30 minutes. I do three things in that 30 minutes: HIG first, then Textbook, and last is Workbook. The HIG will usually take us anywhere from just under 10 minutes to just over 15 minutes; depending on the topic, the activity, and the processing time for the student. I estimate that the Textbook usually takes about 5 minutes. And the time remaining is left for the Workbook. As I mentioned above, sometimes the Workbook assignment isn't finished in that Math Lesson session, and in that case we pick it up the next day. On that next day, sometimes I'll do some review with a HIG activity or an extension, or maybe I'll do a bit with the textbook, and then let the rest of the Math Lesson time be for finishing the workbook assignment. But finishing the workbook could easily be placed into the independent worktime.

 

Is there any way I can tweak it?

 

Thirty minutes for each child does add up fast. But the time also drops quickly by shaving off 10 minutes for each. Maybe you wouldn't have to dedicate an entire 30 minutes for each math lesson you teach. Maybe 15-20 minutes, or however much time it takes to do the HIG teaching plan and then a look at the Textbook. The Workbook can be independent.

 

Maybe you could tweak your schedule slightly.

 

"What we usually do, is the three all start maths at same time, the older are working to complete 2 or 3 pages in their workbook, if they need help or a new concept taught, I am right there."

 

Maybe you could have two of your dc start with doing some of the Mental Math practices from the HIG appendix while you focus 15 minutes of HIG Teaching Activity with your oldest dd. Then have your oldest dd move into the Workbook while you focus on the next dc’s lesson. Maybe you could borrow an independent assignment from another subject to give you three math lesson sessions. Let’s see if a table can explain this idea better. For the purpose of this example, I’ll borrow from LA and use copywork as the independent work. Would 15 minutes for each column be a good place to start?

 

DC#1:  HIG & Textbook   (with you)       * Workbook                     * Mental Math Work  * Copywork

DC#2:  Mental Math Work             * HIG & Textbook   (with you)  * Workbook               * Copywork

DC#3: Copywork                           * Mental Math Work        * HIG & Text   (with you)    * Workbook

 

(eta: the table I made did not paste and so I tried to create a non-table table :/, but it will likely look all wonky depending on your viewing theme. The idea is that each DC is a row and the columns are separated by a *. Each column shows what a dc is doing while you take turns focusing on each dc. If this table is meaningless, let me know and I'll try something else. :) )

 

And in that last column, you’d float among the three dc and interrupt the copywork as needed to help with anything they needed you for in the math workbook while you were focused in a math lesson. You could use that time in the last column to check their workbook work and pull them away from the copywork to fix their mistakes. But the copywork (or something like it) would allow them to not sit idle if they needed you while you were focused on their sibling.

 

But getting into this kind of detail is highly personal and touchy. What fits one family may be a total flop in another family. Keep on tweaking until you find something that works. Does anything I offer there look at all doable for your situation?

 

I'm thrilled that you and your dd enjoyed the HIG teaching activities and that you have hit upon a way to help your dd enjoy math more. :hooray:

Edited by Shell Lee

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flowergirl159

 

 Would 15 minutes for each column be a good place to start?

 

DC#1:  HIG & Textbook   (with you)       * Workbook                     * Mental Math Work  * Copywork

DC#2:  Mental Math Work             * HIG & Textbook   (with you)  * Workbook               * Copywork

DC#3: Copywork                           * Mental Math Work        * HIG & Text   (with you)    * Workbook

 

 Does anything I offer there look at all doable for your situation?

 

I'm thrilled that you and your dd enjoyed the HIG teaching activities and that you have hit upon a way to help your dd enjoy math more. :hooray:

Thank you so so so much! Your posts have been a great help :)

 

Yes this table is exactly what I needed to see. I think my older will need more than 15mins of HIG & textbook, at least to start with.

 

I will have a play around with a possible table and see how we go. My youngest child is only just 5, so I am sort of working on Singapore EB with her, maybe adding Miquon before we go onto Singapore 1A. I don't think there is a lot of mental math or independent work I can get her to do at the moment (if you have any suggestions of mental math activities I could have her do, I'd be very appreciative). Although I do have other independent activities, not related to math, that may work in that timeslot.

 

Thanks so much :)

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Shell Lee

Thank you so so so much! Your posts have been a great help :)

 

Yes this table is exactly what I needed to see. I think my older will need more than 15mins of HIG & textbook, at least to start with.

 

I will have a play around with a possible table and see how we go. My youngest child is only just 5, so I am sort of working on Singapore EB with her, maybe adding Miquon before we go onto Singapore 1A. I don't think there is a lot of mental math or independent work I can get her to do at the moment (if you have any suggestions of mental math activities I could have her do, I'd be very appreciative). Although I do have other independent activities, not related to math, that may work in that timeslot.

 

Thanks so much :)

 

 

 

For your 5 y/o, I would not suggest mental math for her. She would benefit most from time with manipulatives. I'd start your group math time by giving your 5 y/o the focused attention. Her lesson will be nice and short and would fit well time-wise with how long your other dc would likely spend on a mental math exercise. I'd satisfy her need for your attention, fill up her love-bucket,  and then move on to the others. She could be free to go play because you've really done enough for her and what she needs at 5 y/o. IF you want her to, she could work independently on mathy activities such as some work with the Pattern Blocks, Mighty Minds, or a workbook like Building Thinking Skills (which use Attribute Blocks and Multi-link cubes), etc.  If it were me, I'd not give her an equal amount of my time within the group math session. I give her just what she needs and then move on to giving the older dc what they need. At this stage of mathematical development, I believe the older dc need a bigger share of time and attention.

 

I'm glad to hear that you feel helped here and that you have a starting place for changes you want to make. There is no reason for any of us to reinvent the wheel. I really appreciate how the forums here allow us to sharpen each other, borrow ideas, and building upon ideas so that we have something that can work for our individual homeschools. :)

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MommyPenguin

Shelley, thank you so much for your posting!  I'll admit that I, like flowergirl, had pretty much just been letting my daughter read the textbook and do the workbook problems on her own, answering questions as she had them, explaining techniques along the way.  I knew I *should* really be using the HIG but I just never really bothered with it.  But I like how you mentioned structuring your lessons.  I think I'm going to try doing the HIG/textbook lesson in the morning first then, before I set Emily loose with her seatwork (which includes the workbook).  I think that might help her grasp the concepts better.

 

Can I ask you a question about the mental math?  I can't figure out by looking at it, and my HIG doesn't seem to say... are you supposed to read the problem aloud to the child and have them solve it in their head and say it back to you?  Or are they supposed to be looking at the problem and saying/writing the answer?

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Shell Lee

Shelley, thank you so much for your posting!  I'll admit that I, like flowergirl, had pretty much just been letting my daughter read the textbook and do the workbook problems on her own, answering questions as she had them, explaining techniques along the way.  I knew I *should* really be using the HIG but I just never really bothered with it.  But I like how you mentioned structuring your lessons.  I think I'm going to try doing the HIG/textbook lesson in the morning first then, before I set Emily loose with her seatwork (which includes the workbook).  I think that might help her grasp the concepts better.

 

Can I ask you a question about the mental math?  I can't figure out by looking at it, and my HIG doesn't seem to say... are you supposed to read the problem aloud to the child and have them solve it in their head and say it back to you?  Or are they supposed to be looking at the problem and saying/writing the answer?

 

Your signature says you are using 1B, so I pulled out my HIG for 1B and found a reference there. At the bottom of page 4 it says:

 

To use these, either point to the problem and have your student answer, or make copies and have your student write the answers. You could have your student do one mental math exercise a day for a while. They can be repeated.

(I found that in the paragraph above the list of math facts that need to be memorized by unit 3.)

 

 

I have used them both ways.

 

I've done the point and answer method, especially when I want to see them use the mental math strategies that match up with what we are working on, and will sometimes even make them say aloud the in between thinking. (For example, on something like 7 + 9 =__, I'll want to hear "take 1 from the 7 to make a 10, then 10 and 6 make 16). But that is just when I'm interested in reinforcing a certain strategy.

 

I have made copies of the Mental Math exercises and had my student write the answers in during their independent time. I have also made multiple copies of the same Mental Math exercise and do the same ones repeatedly over the course of a week or so. I have also had them time themselves as they do the Mental Maths, and redo them, to see if they can improve their time.

 

 

I believe you'll find that using your HIG will be worth the bother, and that it isn't too much work. To me, the idea of just reading through the textbook and answering questions is so very dry. I think of it like serving up cold fish on a saggy paper plate. :) The HIG transforms the lessons into a tasty feast that tantalizes more mathematical thinking portions of the brain.

 

But I do understand how tempting it is to just get to the workbook and have something concrete to show for your time. (Like flowergirl's dd was feeling.) Doing the Teaching Activities and playing some of those suggested games are productive too! It just isn't the kind of product that can be stuck up on the refrigerator. Developing mathematical thinking is more valuable than completing a workbook page. And doing the activities will really you give insight into how your student's mathematical thinking is progressing.

 

I'm sure you are right that Emily will be able to grasp the concepts better; she'll be able to grasp them, really internalize them, and make them her own. Since I have my HIG for 1B out, I found this paragraph (in the introduction on page i, paragraph 3) to encourage you with:

 

An important feature of learning mathematics with this curriculum is the use of a concrete introduction to the concept, followed by a pictorial representation, followed by the abstract symbols. The textbook supplies the pictoral and abstract aspects of this progression. You, as the teacher, should supply the concrete introduction.

 

Thus, if you primarily rely on the textbook, you are skipping an important feature of the Singapore curriculum. I've even heard some say that it isn't really Singapore Math anymore if you skip the HIGs, and I understand why they say this.

 

And really, the HIGs make it very easy for you to supply the concrete introductions. I do not find the teaching activities to be bothersome or too much work at all. Now, I don't do every single activity, but I do make doing them my default position.

 

I can't see how you'd regret it. :)

Edited by Shell Lee

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MommyPenguin

Thank you so much, Shelley!  And thanks for giving me the page that had the information about the mental math.  I looked at the back of the book where the mental math was, in the beginning introductory pages, and right where it had the assignment to work on Mental Math 8, but I didn't think to just look for the first place they assigned mental math to see what they said.

 

I guess what I had been going by was people saying that you didn't really need the HIG until Singapore 2, and that if you knew how to do the problems the Singapore way, you could just use the textbook/workbook.  I understood exactly the theory that they were teaching in the assignments, so I figured that was enough.  :)  Also, I'd tried RightStart first with this particular child, and discovered that she does *not* like hands-on math or math toys of any sort.

 

I tried a lesson with her today, just the part from the HIG.  She'd already read the textbook and done the workbook for this assignment, but I thought that the HIG had some useful skills to impart before we got to the next lesson (for which she hasn't done the workbook pages yet).  So I figured it would be easier to do just this one lesson today, while there's no other school.  I even got a brand-new whiteboard.  :)

 

She was *very* resistant.  Didn't like it at all.  She was glad she didn't *also* have workbook pages, but she didn't want to do it.  Not sure how much was "math on Sunday???" and how much was not liking the format.  But, hopefully she'll get used to it.  :)

 

I wonder if part of it could be not really liking the concrete introduction?  She's always preferred working with numbers to working with counters.  So maybe that's something that we need to work on, to make sure she's really understanding things at the concrete level.  She's always been much more of a "story" thinker (if 5 + 2 had her stymied, I'd say, "well, you're five... how old will you be in two years?" and she'd have it).

 

Her sister, Jenny, did find it interesting and wanted to blurt out all the answers.  :)  So I might not have any problem doing it with Jenny when she gets to it!  She's nearing the end of Earlybird B right now.  I need to get the 1A workbooks for her soon.  Not sure how old she'd have to be to do them, though.  But she's doing quite well in the Earlybird B, she's doing addition and subtraction, and she does it fairly quickly with no mistakes.  So she might be a bit of a mathy kid, or just has absorbed a lot from her sister.  She was so proud of herself the other day when she said, "Mommy, there are six vitamins left.  There are three of us, so... we have two days of vitamins left!" and I told her that she'd done division and that that was 2nd grade math.  She went around telling everybody, "I did second grade math!"  Heh.

 

Oh, and I've never put a math page on the fridge.  :)  I really wanted RightStart math to work, which has almost no worksheets.  Really, the reason I didn't get to the HIG is just that she was able to be independent with just doing the textbook/workbook, and I'm lazy/have other kids I'm teaching, so I let her go more than I ought to have.

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Shell Lee

Thank you so much, Shelley! And thanks for giving me the page that had the information about the mental math. I looked at the back of the book where the mental math was, in the beginning introductory pages, and right where it had the assignment to work on Mental Math 8, but I didn't think to just look for the first place they assigned mental math to see what they said.

A second set of eyes sure help!

I guess what I had been going by was people saying that you didn't really need the HIG until Singapore 2, and that if you knew how to do the problems the Singapore way, you could just use the textbook/workbook. I understood exactly the theory that they were teaching in the assignments, so I figured that was enough. :) Also, I'd tried RightStart first with this particular child, and discovered that she does *not* like hands-on math or math toys of any sort.

I tried a lesson with her today, just the part from the HIG. She'd already read the textbook and done the workbook for this assignment, but I thought that the HIG had some useful skills to impart before we got to the next lesson (for which she hasn't done the workbook pages yet). So I figured it would be easier to do just this one lesson today, while there's no other school. I even got a brand-new whiteboard. :)

She was *very* resistant. Didn't like it at all. She was glad she didn't *also* have workbook pages, but she didn't want to do it. Not sure how much was "math on Sunday???" and how much was not liking the format. But, hopefully she'll get used to it. :)

At first read, I wasn't too surprised that she was resistant, just because of something new...and Sunday math :Big Grin Guy:. But when you share that you've done Right Start with her and she has always resisted the manipulatives, then that is curious. Her preference in how to process new information is something to consider as you select curriculum for her. But something else to consider as a cause of her resistance is that it could possibly be a way of covering for a weakness in understanding. Sometimes kids can get the answers, do the steps, and yet not truly understand what they are doing or why they are doing it; and truly not care. Manipulatives would make a such a student impatient and frustrated. I'm not saying that is Emily. I wouldn't know, of course. But I just want to throw that out to you as a possibility...which, according to your comments in your next paragraph, you've already considered.

I wonder if part of it could be not really liking the concrete introduction? She's always preferred working with numbers to working with counters. So maybe that's something that we need to work on, to make sure she's really understanding things at the concrete level. She's always been much more of a "story" thinker (if 5 + 2 had her stymied, I'd say, "well, you're five... how old will you be in two years?" and she'd have it).

I wonder how she would respond if you went from the story to next asking her what that story of "how old will you be in two years" look like if you wanted to show it with counters. Then what would that story look like if we wrote it as a number sentence. Have you done that with her?

Representing the problem in the three forms (the oral story, the counters, the number sentence) is a good way to elicit and extend understanding, and the HIG does encourage this. She can enter the problem where she feels strong, the story; and then build up the modes where she shows frustration.

Her sister, Jenny, did find it interesting and wanted to blurt out all the answers. :) So I might not have any problem doing it with Jenny when she gets to it! She's nearing the end of Earlybird B right now. I need to get the 1A workbooks for her soon. Not sure how old she'd have to be to do them, though. But she's doing quite well in the Earlybird B, she's doing addition and subtraction, and she does it fairly quickly with no mistakes. So she might be a bit of a mathy kid, or just has absorbed a lot from her sister. She was so proud of herself the other day when she said, "Mommy, there are six vitamins left. There are three of us, so... we have two days of vitamins left!" and I told her that she'd done division and that that was 2nd grade math. She went around telling everybody, "I did second grade math!" Heh.

Cute.

Oh, and I've never put a math page on the fridge. :)

Gasp! More grief to me. Lol. Okay, not really.

I really wanted RightStart math to work, which has almost no worksheets.

Singapore just might be a great fit for her then, with its mix of manipulatives and workbooks. One may help her bridge to the other and in the process add dimension to her understanding. But it is something to monitor. I hear what you are saying about really wanting RightStart to have worked. It is such a disappointment to me when an approach that I like doesn't work with my dc. Why can't they just see things my way? :dontknow:

Really, the reason I didn't get to the HIG is just that she was able to be independent with just doing the textbook/workbook, and I'm lazy/have other kids I'm teaching, so I let her go more than I ought to have.

No shaming. Maybe you can let this go with her. We each prioritize what we do because we can't do everything, right? And so if you have bigger fish to fry, and she is resisting the HIG, then how could anyone think it is lazy to put your energies to a more productive end? The HIG is a rich resource. The Teaching Activities are not terribly bothersome to present, but dealing with resistance can be.

I am disturbed to think that I've made you feel shame or lazy because I've encouraged you to use the HIG. The HIG is good stuff. It shouldn't be carelessly dismissed. All things being equal, it deserves attention. But not all things are equal, and if you have to let it go, then so be it. :)

Just my 2¢

Edited by Shell Lee

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flowergirl159

This thread is so interesting!! :D

 

I love the idea of using a mental math page more than once! And using the same sheet over and over with a timer! My DD9 would love that :D

 

Just another question Shelley :) I don't have a HIG for 1A or 1B, I didn't realise they were available for that level. So I have one child in 3A and one child in 2A. Neither of them have all their addition facts/ number bonds memorised. And I think this causes a lot of drama when it comes to math. Is there anyway I can sort of back track (without loosing pace in our current books) to help them memorise those early facts?

 

ETA: I also have Miquon and have used some of it in the past. I'd really like to incorporate Miquon into our maths plans. DD7 who is in 2A, has completed the first two Miquon books. DD9 has completed some Miquon sheets that I have printed off in random order for her. But I'd like to use Miquon alongside Singapore. Maybe they could each do two pages a day in Miquon? Any ideas?

Edited by flowergirl159

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Strix

If you wanted to go back and work on facts, I would just add in flash cards or some other math drills.  We use our Ipad for drills - there's an app called Math Drills and another called bird bonds (both pay for, but worthwhile) that my kids have liked. My DD does really like to do drills a lot, but her fact memorization has improved. I  have her do 25 - 50 problems before she can move on to playing another game.  DD doesn't have her number bonds memorized, but I figure if she's got the facts memorized it's better than nothing.

 

Carrie

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MommyPenguin

Okay, so we did the HIG lesson again today, and it went a little better.  She was really intent on playing with the whiteboard markers (she's a fiddler), but she was able to follow the lesson, I think.  She also did better with the Mental Math since I showed her the chart and just let her answer aloud.  She was much faster.

 

I also found myself thinking about RightStart and all that, and remembering the nice little math games package that came with it, I think partly because the HIG mentioned playing games to practice the addition/subtraction facts.  So I set up a card game for "addition bingo," and it was a pretty big hit.  Emily was definitely reluctant at first, but got into it and did well.  Jenny wanted to play, too, and did surprisingly well.  So that might be nice, that both are able to play the game, so we can all play together.  We might try that game again tomorrow.  Although nobody got a reading lesson today, so I will need to prioritize things a bit differently.

 

Shelley, please don't feel guilty about shaming me or anything.  I meant it in more of a joking way, but I do truly struggle with laziness and not getting things done, but that's on me, not on anything you said.  The thing is that math is our highest priority homeschool-wise (it's something my husband feels strongly about), so I *do* want to do my best to make it work.

 

We actually do another "math" period during the day, but not Singapore.  It's either Life of Fred (which Emily *adores* and sometimes does most of a book in one day), Critical Thinking Skills, or Mind Benders (which are logic puzzles).  She was doing some Kumon books on dealing with money and telling time, but she has finished those, so now it just alternates between these.  I also have a Dreambox account for the oldest two kids.  It actually has a lot of activities like working with an abacus or a numberline, grouping things into boxes, and some of the other hands-on manipulative activities that she's been missing in our daily work.  Somehow she doesn't mind them as much when they're in a computer game.  :)

 

I'm also working on getting a table for the playroom/schoolroom that can be cut lower, and having the kids sit on exercise balls to do their work.  I think they'll enjoy that, and it's supposed to help with concentration because they can get some of their wiggles out just by trying to sit still on the ball.  We'll see how that goes.  :)  I have the balls already, but the current table is too high and can't be cut shorter.

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Shell Lee

Just another question Shelley :) I don't have a HIG for 1A or 1B, I didn't realise they were available for that level. So I have one child in 3A and one child in 2A. Neither of them have all their addition facts/ number bonds memorised. And I think this causes a lot of drama when it comes to math. Is there anyway I can sort of back track (without loosing pace in our current books) to help them memorise those early facts?

ETA: I also have Miquon and have used some of it in the past. I'd really like to incorporate Miquon into our maths plans. DD7 who is in 2A, has completed the first two Miquon books. DD9 has completed some Miquon sheets that I have printed off in random order for her. But I'd like to use Miquon alongside Singapore. Maybe they could each do two pages a day in Miquon? Any ideas?

Yep. You can keep your pace and add in the work on memorizing facts. You could use the Mental Math sheets from 2A with dd9 if you wanted. You are right-on that the drama could be coming from a lack of having these facts down pat.

I haven't used Miquon, so I can't say how many pages to accomplish in a day alongside Singapore. From what I understand, it is mostly independent so it could be assigned to one dc while you do a Singapore lesson with another. But since it is discovery based, and discoveries don't always happen on schedule, I don't know how the pacing works.

Between working on the facts and the Miquon, your girls have plenty to do while you do Singpore teaching activities.

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Shell Lee

Okay, so we did the HIG lesson again today, and it went a little better. She was really intent on playing with the whiteboard markers (she's a fiddler), but she was able to follow the lesson, I think. She also did better with the Mental Math since I showed her the chart and just let her answer aloud. She was much faster.

I also found myself thinking about RightStart and all that, and remembering the nice little math games package that came with it, I think partly because the HIG mentioned playing games to practice the addition/subtraction facts. So I set up a card game for "addition bingo," and it was a pretty big hit. Emily was definitely reluctant at first, but got into it and did well. Jenny wanted to play, too, and did surprisingly well. So that might be nice, that both are able to play the game, so we can all play together. We might try that game again tomorrow. Although nobody got a reading lesson today, so I will need to prioritize things a bit differently.

Shelley, please don't feel guilty about shaming me or anything. I meant it in more of a joking way, but I do truly struggle with laziness and not getting things done, but that's on me, not on anything you said. The thing is that math is our highest priority homeschool-wise (it's something my husband feels strongly about), so I *do* want to do my best to make it work.

We actually do another "math" period during the day, but not Singapore. It's either Life of Fred (which Emily *adores* and sometimes does most of a book in one day), Critical Thinking Skills, or Mind Benders (which are logic puzzles). She was doing some Kumon books on dealing with money and telling time, but she has finished those, so now it just alternates between these. I also have a Dreambox account for the oldest two kids. It actually has a lot of activities like working with an abacus or a numberline, grouping things into boxes, and some of the other hands-on manipulative activities that she's been missing in our daily work. Somehow she doesn't mind them as much when they're in a computer game. :)

I'm also working on getting a table for the playroom/schoolroom that can be cut lower, and having the kids sit on exercise balls to do their work. I think they'll enjoy that, and it's supposed to help with concentration because they can get some of their wiggles out just by trying to sit still on the ball. We'll see how that goes. :) I have the balls already, but the current table is too high and can't be cut shorter.

That's a really great update. You've really got the math bases covered!

About your table that is too tall, my dc use some balance discs for seat cushions. Like these: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000WQ4Z94/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1394065544&sr=1-1

Maybe those would be more convenient that shortening the table. Just throwing out ideas. :)

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MommyPenguin

I like those, Shelley, but my goal in shortening the table was that it's supposed to be really good for kids to have both feet on the floor to provide support for writing, and having kids sit on exercise balls is supposed to help them concentrate.  So I had this grand idea about getting a table, getting exercise balls, and cutting the table shorter to match.  Just having a little hiccup in implementation, namely in finding a table on craigslist.  :)

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