Mazurka

Best 4 or 5 books in 530 World Literature?

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Mazurka

I bought 530 World Literature even though I probably won't have a student who will "do" this program.   The books called to me, though, so I bought the program anyhow. :BigGrinGuy:

My younger son is doing a different world lit program this year, but the program involves a bit of sometimes tedious lit analysis.  I would like to maybe add in a few books from Core 530 that might be more fun or entertaining, without having to do a lot of lit analysis. 

We're planning to do Gilgamesh together, but I'm look for a few other books that might just be fun and not too heavy. Suggestions?

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Mazurka

Just giving a bump in case any 530 users are around and reading this

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Bendxap

I'll give it a bump, too.

I looked through the list and haven't read any of them.

Oh, wait, I did read Night. It's very good but very heavy (Jews during WWII).

And years ago I started reading Don Quixote in English and thought it was one of the dumbest books ever. I wonder if it would be better in Spanish.

We have a copy of Persepolis in the children's library; it's in graphic novel style, as I recall. Hmmm, maybe I should borrow it and read it!

ETA: If you're interested in a similar forum, check this out.

Edited by Bendxap
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Mazurka
On 10/20/2018 at 1:50 PM, Bendxap said:

I'll give it a bump, too.

I looked through the list and haven't read any of them.

Oh, wait, I did read Night. It's very good but very heavy (Jews during WWII).

And years ago I started reading Don Quixote in English and thought it was one of the dumbest books ever. I wonder if it would be better in Spanish.

We have a copy of Persepolis in the children's library; it's in graphic novel style, as I recall. Hmmm, maybe I should borrow it and read it!

Yeah, Night is heavy.  Will read that last year alongside The Hiding Place and then did a compare and contrast.  Very interesting, but definitely not easy.

Persepolis sounds like a good possibility. 

I liked Don Quijote when I read it.  I was in Seville, and I was supposed to be reading it in Spanish, but I bailed on that and got the English version.  I'm really sad that I lost all those books with the flooding after Hurricane Floyd.

Anyhow, I'm thinking of King Lear because it's short and it's Shakespeare. Ben just read the Julius Caesar  with the same publisher and enjoyed it.  

Maybe Tartuffe?  

Can anybody comment on Copenhagen?  That sounds like a book Ben might enjoy.

What about When Things Fall Apart?

It looks like Sonlight took the book lists off the website.  I have to keep going into my orders to see the books that are included, and every time I look at a description, I have to reload my order.  Sigh. 

If anybody has any comments on Tartuffe, Copenhagen and When Things Fall Apart, I'd appreciate it.  Or if you think there may be better choices.  Ben is probably not into a lot of heavy, complicated reading.  He is a good reader, but I'm not wanting to bog him down right now.

 

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Jen in ME

My dd read Copenhagen and LOVED it.  Actually, it is a play and she listened to it on-line, but she liked it so much that later on she reread it for her own enjoyment.  For one of her college applications she had to list some of her favorite books and Copenhagen made the list.  She loved how the story unfolded as the scientists from Germany/U.S tried to recreate what happened when they worked on the atom bomb.  She did not expect to like it that much.

I read Persepolis and did not have my dd read it.  I felt like there was a repeating plot.  The main character makes a bad decision as a child and her parents prevent her from facing any consequences, the main character makes a bad decision as a teenager and her parents prevent her from facing any consequences, the main character as a young adult makes increasingly bad decisions and her parents continue to make sure she doesn't face any consequences.  Except that she does face consequences.  Without any insight. 

I'd definitely pre-read Persepolis and then consider if your child will be able to see the pattern.

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Jen in ME

Oh, and we read The Insanity of God.  It was really good.

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Mazurka
On 10/23/2018 at 5:39 PM, Jen in ME said:

My dd read Copenhagen and LOVED it.  Actually, it is a play and she listened to it on-line, but she liked it so much that later on she reread it for her own enjoyment.  For one of her college applications she had to list some of her favorite books and Copenhagen made the list.  She loved how the story unfolded as the scientists from Germany/U.S tried to recreate what happened when they worked on the atom bomb.  She did not expect to like it that much.

Sounds like this will be a good book for Ben.

On 10/23/2018 at 5:39 PM, Jen in ME said:

I read Persepolis and did not have my dd read it.  I felt like there was a repeating plot.  The main character makes a bad decision as a child and her parents prevent her from facing any consequences, the main character makes a bad decision as a teenager and her parents prevent her from facing any consequences, the main character as a young adult makes increasingly bad decisions and her parents continue to make sure she doesn't face any consequences.  Except that she does face consequences.  Without any insight. 

I'd definitely pre-read Persepolis and then consider if your child will be able to see the pattern.

Thanks for this.  I will check it out and make a decision.

On 10/23/2018 at 5:42 PM, Jen in ME said:

Oh, and we read The Insanity of God.  It was really good.

I just read the summary for that, and this sounds like something I would like to read, too.

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Mazurka

So this is what I'm thinking about for Ben:

King Lear

Copenhagen

Insanity of God

Things Fall Apart

 

Possibly:  Persepolis and Don Quixote

Maybe, maybe the Iliad or the Aeneid.  We read abridged versions a few years back, so he has had some exposure, but it would be nice to read these on a higher level.  I'm just not sure that I would choose these over something new to us. 

Thanks for your help!  

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Amiables

I think you have a good list overall--just a few more options for you to consider.

Persepolis is just the first half/first volume. There's a sequel (sometimes printed together in a bind-up), and it's rotten. I liked the SL part, though--but since it's about war in Iran, it's not light. 

In truth, I think The Odyssey is outstanding and entertaining. My dh read it as an adult and was like, "Why have I never read this?! It's AMAZING!" It is one of my 10-on-a-desert-island books. To me, that's a DO NOT MISS. 

You can probably find a video version of The Misanthrope, as it is a funny comedy.

I think The Insanity of God is good for everyone, so definitely a fan of you doing that one.

Lear is one of the most intense of Shakespeare's plays. Really not comfortable to see, but super good for cultural literacy.

I think the Iliad version is a lovely translation, and it abridges out all the battles that don't really move the plot forward. There's not a ton of plot in The Iliad, but what's there is very powerful.

Gilgamesh is awesome. 

I thought Don Quixote incredibly funny when I read it as a teen. Laugh-out-loud-on-an-airplane funny. But it's lengthy. 

Copenhagen is AWESOME. So is the Daniel Craig version online. 

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Mazurka
3 minutes ago, Amiables said:

I think you have a good list overall--just a few more options for you to consider.

Persepolis is just the first half/first volume. There's a sequel (sometimes printed together in a bind-up), and it's rotten. I liked the SL part, though--but since it's about war in Iran, it's not light. 

In truth, I think The Odyssey is outstanding and entertaining. My dh read it as an adult and was like, "Why have I never read this?! It's AMAZING!" It is one of my 10-on-a-desert-island books. To me, that's a DO NOT MISS. 

You can probably find a video version of The Misanthrope, as it is a funny comedy.

I think The Insanity of God is good for everyone, so definitely a fan of you doing that one.

Lear is one of the most intense of Shakespeare's plays. Really not comfortable to see, but super good for cultural literacy.

I think the Iliad version is a lovely translation, and it abridges out all the battles that don't really move the plot forward. There's not a ton of plot in The Iliad, but what's there is very powerful.

Gilgamesh is awesome. 

I thought Don Quixote incredibly funny when I read it as a teen. Laugh-out-loud-on-an-airplane funny. But it's lengthy. 

Copenhagen is AWESOME. So is the Daniel Craig version online. 

Thank you, Amy.   I'm so glad you chimed in.   I'll add in Odyssey based on your recommendation.

Adding here, I've really appreciated your input on the forums throughout the years.  I think your literature selections are great, and I positively drooled when I opened up the World Literature box.  Truthfully, I bought it knowing that my students wouldn't be able to use it all, but I knew I would eventually get to it myself.  Same with the Brit Lit. 

I'll miss you, Amy!   Thanks for being a Sonlight voice on the forums. 

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Amiables

What a lovely thing to read as the forums sunset. It's been a delight to see your boys grow up through the years. I'd love to get occasional updates about all of you. My Sonlight email is my first initial, last name @sonlight.com. 

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Mazurka
11 hours ago, Amiables said:

What a lovely thing to read as the forums sunset. It's been a delight to see your boys grow up through the years. I'd love to get occasional updates about all of you. My Sonlight email is my first initial, last name @sonlight.com. 

I will be in touch, Amy.

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